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Twelfth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Federation of Jewish Charities 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



ORGANIZED JUNE 1, 1910 
INCORPORATED APRIL 1, 1921 



CONSTITUENT SOCIETIES 

BOARD OF JEWISH EDUCATION 

EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 

EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 

HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 

JEWISH COMMITTEE FOR PERSONAL SERVICE 

IN STATE INSTITUTIONS 

MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 

PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM AND HOME SOCIETY 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1921 



Office 

436 O'FARRELL STREET 

Telephone Franklin 546 



INDEX 

Board of Jewish Education Page No. 

Officers 103 

Financial Statement 104 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 

Officers 78 

Committees 79 

President's Report 81 

Financial Statement 89-91 

Head Worker's Report 83 

Building Fund Subscriptions 92-95 

Eureka Benevolent Society 

Officers and Committees 52 

President's Report 53 

Vice-President's Report 58 

Financial Statement 61-64 

Statistics 65-67 

Federation of Jewish Charities 

Officers and Board of Governors 3 

Committees 4 

Donations 16-17 

President's Report 5 

Financial Statement 13-16 

Comparative Tables 19-20 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 

Officers t 97 

Financial Statement . 102 

President's Report 98 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 

Officers 68 

President's Report 70 

Financial Statement 74-77 

Jewish Committee for Personal Service in State Institutions 

Officers f05 

Executive Secretary's Report 107 

Financial Statement 106 

Mount Zion Hospital 

Officers and Directors 30 

Committees 31 

House and Social Service Staff * . 32-33 

Dispensary Staff 34 

Visiting Staff 33 

President's Report 35 

Financial Statement 40-42 

Superintendent of Social Service's Report 44 

Statistics 50-51 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society 

Officers and Trustees 22 

Committees 22-23 

Financial Statement 24-29 



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EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 
FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



607652 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



OFFICERS 1922 



President 

MORGAN A. GUNST 

First Vice-President 

SYLVAIN S. KAUFFMAN 

Second Vice-President 

MRS. I. W. HELLMAN, Jr. 



Treasurer 

MAX P. LILIENTHAL 

Secretary 

MEYER H. LEVY 

Supt. of Social Service 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH 



Honorary President 

HENRY SINSHEIMER 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



According to Constituent Societies Representation 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 

Mrs. Matilda Esberg 
Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 



Eureka Benevolent Society 

Simon Anspacher 
Sylvan L. Bernstein 
Jonas Bloom 
Morgan A. Gunst 
Richard E. Gutstadt 
Moses Kaplan 
Edward S. Lees 
Alfred F. Meyer 
Morris Mitau 
Henry Sinsheimer 
Jesse H. Steinhart 
John I. Walter 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 

M. Spiegelman 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 

Samuel Abrahm 
Albert M. Bender 
Joseph Hyman 
Emile E. Kahn 
Ira Kahn 
Isaac Moss 



Mount Zion Hospital 

Mrs. Julius Baer 
Frederick Baruch 
Albert E. Castle 
S. L. Dinkelspiel 
Mrs. A. L. Ehrman 
E. S. Heller 
Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
J. B. Levison 
Maurice Liebmann 
Max P. Lilienthal 
Henry S. Manheim 

J. S. SlLVERBERG 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

and Home Society 

Mrs. Walter Arnstein 
Sidney M. Ehrman 
Alfred I. Esberg 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Louis S. Haas 
Sylvan S. Kauffman 
Melvil S. Nickelsburg 
Louis A. Schwabacher 
Edgar Sinton 
Hon. M. C. Sloss 
Max Sommer 
Mrs. Jesse H. Steinhart 



— 3 — 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1922 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MORGAN A. GUNST, Chairman 

Term expires March Term expires March 

Mrs. Walter Arnstein 1923 Moses Kaplan 1924 

Mrs. Julius Baer 1925 Sylvain S. Kauffman 1923 

Samuel L. Dinkelspiei 1925 Edward S. Lees 1924 

Alfred I. Esberg 1925 Max P. Lilienthal 1923 

Morgan A. Gunst 1924 Alfred Falck Meyer 1925 

Richard E. Gutstadt 1924 Isaac Moss 1923 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr 1925 Edgar Sinton 1924 

Max Sommer 1923 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

MAX P. LILIENTHAL, Chairman 
Samuel L. Dinkelspiel Moses Kaplan 

COMMITTEE ON INTERNAL RELATIONS 

ALFRED I. ESBERG, Chairman 
Edward S. Lees Max Sommer 

COMMITTEE ON BUDGETS 

EDGAR SINTON, Chairman 
Isaac Moss Alfred Falck Meyer 

COMMITTEE ON SUBSCRIPTIONS 

SYLVAIN S. KAUFFMAN, Chairman 
Max P. Lilienthal Richard E. Gutstadt 

REHABILITATION COMMITTEE 

HENRY SINSHEIMER Chairman 

MORRIS MITAU Vice-Chairman 

MEYER H. LEVY Secretary 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH Superintendent 

Israel Friedman Mrs. Adolph Mack 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. Morris Spiegelman 

CHILDREN'S WELFARE BUREAU 

SIMON ANSPACHER Chairman 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH Secretary 

Mrs. J. L. Goodday Dr. Samuel Langer 

Gustav Lachman Mrs. Amanda Schlesinger 

BUREAU FOR DEPENDENT AGED 

ISAAC MOSS Chairman 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH Secretary 

Samuel Abrahm Maurice Liebmann 

Louis Friedlander Morris Mitau 

Gustave Schnee 

— 4 — 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

We are brought together this evening to review the record 
of accomplishment during 1921 and to visualize the problems 
that confront us in the coming year. 

For the greater part of the last fiscal year, Mr. Henry 
Sinsheimer served as President. At the beginning of 1921, the 
total subscriptions were far below the amount necessary as 
estimated for the Societies, and I think you all should know 
that Mr. Sinsheimer, although anxious to retire, agreed to 
retain the Presidency until such time as the financial campaign 
for new and increased subscriptions was completed in order 
that the new President would not have to immediately face a 
serious deficit. 

Under the able Chairmanship of Mr. Sylvan L. Bernstein, 
the Committee did fine work so that the total collected from 
subscriptions during 1921 was $228,034.72 — this being the 
largest amount ever collected in the history of the Societies. 
When this total was reached in December, Mr. Sinsheimer 
resigned and I had the honor of being elected President. 

I shall always feel that among the debts of gratitude due 
Mr. Sinsheimer, he is entitled to special praise for the splendid 
spirit he showed in retaining the Presidency until the deficit 
then facing the organization was obtained. 

Your Executive Committee desires to suggest that at 
this Annual Meeting, Mr. Henry Sinsheimer be elected 
Honorary President of the Federation in recognition of his 
splendid record of service in behalf of the organization. The 
resolution will later be presented to you. 

A brief summary of the work of the six constituent societies 
which with two additional committees now comprise the Fed- 
eration will give you a bird's-eye view of our work. At one 
time we had 13 different constituent societies, which have 
been from time to time consolidated. I am sure that the results 
attained under the concentrated plan have proved the wisdom 
of those who brought about the amalgamations. 

EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 

1921 will always remain an important year in the history 
of the Emanu-El Sisterhood. 

For some time past this constituent Society has been 
endeavoring to definitely determine on its future sphere of 
work, and after a great many conferences with the Y. M. 
and Y. W. H. A. the Sisterhood decided to limit its activities 
to a resident home for employed girls, together with such 
educational and recreational activities as are necessary for the 
welfare of the girls in the Home. It was seen that this was the 
most vital work to be undertaken by the Emanu-El Sister- 



hood, and the conclusion was made possible by the Y. M. and 
Y. W. H. A. undertaking certain of the other activities formerly 
handled by the Sisterhood. 

At the last Annual Meeting mention was made that the 
Sisterhood was canvassing for funds for a new Home; it has 
raised all but $20,000.00 of the amount needed. 

A new site has been purchased, plans have been carefully 
drawn for the new building to house sixty girls, and bids are 
now being obtained, with the end in view of limiting the amount 
expended so that it shall as nearly as possible approximate the 
amount of money available. 

EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

This, our Family Welfare Department, has endeavored to 
live up to a slogan— "SERVICE, RATHER THAN MERE 
RELIEF." The work has expanded until additional space is 
needed, which may necessitate the Federation's seeking office 
quarters elsewhere. But even this would only serve as a tempo- 
rary solution because the Society has not only outgrown its 
present space, but the location as well, and eventually the 
Society should be housed in a location close to the people to 
be served. 

With a little planning the solution of this problem is at 
hand, for the Society has a Fund of $150,000.00 known as the 
" Widows and Orphans Fund," which has largely outlived the 
purposes for which it was created; sometime ago the late Mr. 
Otto Irving Wise evolved a plan whereby this fund could be 
made available by the Federation guaranteeing payment of 
the few thousand dollars per year which are necessary to fulfill 
the provisions of the Fund. This matter will have the atten- 
tion of your Executive Committee and the Officers of the 
Eureka Benevolent Society during the coming year. 

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 

This branch of our work has long been recognized as 
preventive and rehabilitative. It has grown steadily, and has 
merited the largest measure of our confidence and the maximum 
of our financial support. Its work is conducted with intelli- 
gence, with despatch, with understanding and in the true spirit 
of "Zedakah" or " Justice.' ' It has created the most favorable 
comment on the part of Jews and non-Jews. However, your 
Executive Committee has felt that in granting to the Society 
allotments which are needed to enable it to properly function, 
it was at the same time, enabling the Society to accumulate a 
surplus which, in fact, belongs to the Federation for the benefit 
of all rather than of ONE constituent society. Accordingly 
your Executive Committee has resolved to arrange to grant 
the Hebrew Free Loan Association an annual allotment which 
shall be sufficient for all reasonable expenses of the Association ; 



such as rent, salaries, stationery and postage, and also for the 
very small actual losses incurred, which, in passing, are so small 
that they are almost negligible; we are prepared from time to 
time, to advance to the Hebrew Free Loan Association sums 
of money, within our capabilities, to enable it to make the 
necessary loans to its clients, but we believe that these advances 
should at all times remain the property of the Federation of 
Jewish Charities, to be called in if the Association at any time 
severs its connection with the Federation or ceases to exist. 

Thus far we have not been able to secure from the Hebrew 
Free Loan Association an official acceptance of this arrange- 
ment, although we have every reason to believe that its Presi- 
dent is convinced of the justice and merit of our position. We 
expect with his assistance to secure definite and affirmative 
action in the near future, and ask your approval in principle of 
this policy. 

HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 

The new building on Silver Avenue is approaching comple- 
tion, and will accommodate about 115 inmates. It is to be more 
than a mere home for aged; it is designed to provide care for 
those who by reason of physical incapacity cannot be taken 
care of elsewhere. It is hoped that the new institution will 
answer our needs for many years to come. 

MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 

The conduct of the Hospital and its policies have elicited 
very favorable comment on the part of Dr. William C. Hassler, 
Health Officer of our County, in his capacity as Chairman of 
the Health Section of the Council of Social and Health Agen- 
cies of San Francisco. 

The Hospital, though a drain on our resources, has surely 
earned the confidence of the medical profession and laity, and 
for the Jewish people the respect of the community. 

Most important, in my judgment, is its out-patient work, 
its clinics, its visiting physicians and nurses, and finally its 
preventive work, the latest addition to which is the Children's 
Health Centre. Here babies and children of pre-school age 
are examined, not when they are sick, but rather when they 
are well. "PREVENTION versus REPAIR," is the watch- 
word. 

In line with this policy, our Superintendent of Social Service 
has recommended an extension of service to adults. He be- 
lieves, and, in my judgment, rightly believes, that if preventive 
medicine is a fact and not a theory, we owe it to those with 
whom we come into contact to place at their disposal such 
facilities as we can afford, to keep them from getting sick, 
rather than offering to make them well after they have suc- 
cumbed to disease. You will readily realize that such a policy 

— 7 — 



is modern, forward-looking, sensible, and, I dare say, economi- 
cal both for us and for the community. I am pleased to learn 
that the plan has been accepted by committees appointed by 
the Hospital, including its medical authorities, and would have 
been in effect today if the recent influenza situation had not 
intervened. I am assured that within a very short time you 
will be advised of the conduct by the Hospital of an "Adult 
Health Centre," which shall be at the disposal of all our social 
agencies, who will be asked to refer to it all those who come to 
their attention, for regular and periodical physical examina- 
tions. 

In this way the Hospital is rapidly and steadily developing 
into the Health Department of the Federation with the respon- 
sibility of looking after problems of health, instead of sickness. 

PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM 

In June the children were transferred to Homewood 
Terrace, where the new home was formally opened. The Jewish 
Community can well be proud of this latest word in Child- 
caring work in the United States. While there has not elapsed 
sufficient time to draw any conclusions as to the future, either 
as to financial costs or social values resulting from the operation 
of the new children's home, we have heard on every side ad- 
miration for the spirit in which the home was conceived and 
in which it is being operated. 

BOARD OF JEWISH EDUCATION 

During 1921 this Board, which has in charge matters 
affecting the Jewish education of children in the community, 
was organized by your Executive Committee. It includes, so 
far as possible, representatives of every shade of Jewish re- 
ligious thought which exists in our midst. 

The Board spent considerable time in arriving at a curricu- 
lum which shall be helpful to the children, in keeping with the 
traditions of their parents, reasonable in its relationship to 
the educational and recreational needs of the community, and 
within the financial possibilities of the Federation. Such a 
curriculum was put into effect in the four Hebrew schools and 
two Sabbath schools which are being conducted in the Hayes 
Valley, Mission, Daly City and San Bruno Districts. Tuition 
fees were instituted, and while these have not yet reached a 
satisfactory figure, the attitude of the children and the parents 
towards the school work has been greatly improved. 

The various Jewish holidays and festivals are observed by 
the children, their parents and friends in or near the schools, 
giving the community a very excellent opportunity to observe 
the results which are being accomplished. 

It is hoped that through means of these public exhibitions 
and through publicity generally, the work and the policies of 
the Board will become better known. 



REHABILITATION COMMITTEE 

This committee endeavors to rehabilitate on the basis of 
self-support and self-respect those who are actually in need or 
likely to become dependent. It tries to discover latent business 
ability, and advances, when necessary, as a loan, without 
interest or other charges, a sum sufficient to set the client up in 
a small business, to guide him in choice of location and in the 
conduct of his affairs. The fifteen cases which have been 
handled in this way required twenty-three loans, aggregating 
$8,490.00; of this amount $3,636.50 has already been repaid, 
leaving a balance outstanding of $4,853.50. While not all the 
cases have succeeded, and some have had difficulties of the 
same kind as have recently beset older merchants and those of 
greater resources, our Committee feels that the principle under 
which it operates is sound economically and socially. We hope 
that improved business conditions will make the work of this 
Committee somewhat less trying than it has been in the past. 

JEWISH COMMITTEE FOR PERSONAL SERVICE IN 
STATE INSTITUTIONS 

In addition to the foregoing, the Jewish Committee for 
Personal Service in State Institutions, a creation of the Fed- 
eration, made noteworthy progress during the first year of its 
existence. It has secured the good will of the officials of all 
the State Institutions, and particularly of Mr. Ralph T. Fisher, 
Director of Institutions of the State of California. 

It has blazed the trail for other faiths and denominations. 
"SERVICE RATHER THAN SERVICES" is the policy 
of the Committee and its efficient Executive Secretary, Mr. 
William R. Blumenthal. 

The Committee was requested by the State Department of 
Institutions to promote a non-sectarian home for women 
patients discharged from State Institutions, and has succeeded 
through the Council of Social and Health Agencies in having 
the matter favorably considered by the Department of Health 
of the City and County of San Francisco, which has included 
in its budget a sum needed to equip and maintain such a home. 

Recognizing the value of the Committee's work, the Los 
Angeles Federation has recently voluntarily increased its 
subscription from $1,500.00 to $2,400.00. The balance needed 
by the Committee during the year, over the amount allotted 
by us, came from the smaller communities in the State. This 
new co-operative spirit between communities augurs well for 
the future of the Jews in California. 

YOUNG MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 
HEBREW ASSOCIATION 

This is not a part of our Federation, but it is an important 
part of the Jewish community program of social work. 

— 9 — 



The Association is now making an effort to obtain a sound 
financial policy, which shall enable it to carry on its work along 
proper budgetary lines. There is a feeling throughout the 
community that the Young Men's and Young Women's 
Hebrew Association should be a part of the Federation. Our 
limited finances have made this impossible to this time, but it is 
expected and hoped that as we will receive increased support, 
we will be able to include this agency in the list of those whose 
financial requirements we take care of collectively and whose 
program of work we are in a position to influence from the 
community point of view. 

In connection with the Financial Statement, copy of which 
was handed to you, I desire particularly to call your attention 
to the fact that although, as previously indicated, a larger 
amount was collected in 1921 than in any previous year, and 
although $6,370.00 from one general fund was divided among 
them, our Societies still had deficits aggregating about $7,- 
000.00. This is, of course, due to increased responsibilities of 
the Societies. We have now no available surplus, and there- 
fore with the growth of the scope of the philanthropic work of 
the community and the demands which are made on our 
constituent organizations, it is imperative that we either gather 
still larger funds or prepare to curtail our sphere of use- 
fulness. 

In order to act in these matters as we should, after due and 
mature consideration of as much data and information as is 
available, your Executive Committee has determined to take 
up, even more carefully than ever before, the budgets submitted 
to it; they will be considered in close conference with repre- 
sentatives of the Societies ; the reports of disbursements will be 
checked periodically against the amounts allowed on the respec- 
tive budgets, in order to reduce to a minimum the deficits which 
have annually been presented to us for possible payment ; all of 
this with a view of endeavoring to ,do the most necessary and 
important work so far as it can be done with the resources at 
hand. 

In line with this thought may I call to your notice the fact 
that heretofore the budgets have been presented and considered 
in April ; approximately one-third of the fiscal year covered by 
the budget has elapsed. This, in my judgment, does not make 
for sound financing ; your Committee has therefore determined 
to make every effort to consider and pass upon budgets, so 
far as possible, in January of every year, for reasons which are 
too obvious to require comment. 

The work of raising additional funds is really divided into 
two parts: "Increased Subscriptions" and "New Subscrip- 
tions." We believe that we will be able to secure more far- 
reaching results in the future by appointing two separate and 
distinct committees. 



10 — 



I am pleased to advise you that Mr. Mortimer Fleishhacker 
has agreed to serve as Chairman of the " Committee on In- 
creased Subscriptions," and his previous experience and per- 
formances as a leader assure us of satisfactory results. The 
Chairman of the "Committee on New Subscriptions' ' will be 
appointed in the near future. 

During the administration of the late Mr. I. W. Hellman, 
Jr., a series of conferences with the heads of our institutions was 
begun, and for a time continued. The War and the epidemics, 
together with the illness and death of our distinguished leader, 
caused an interruption of these conferences. Realizing their 
value to our work, I hope to arrange for meetings of and with 
our trained workers, so that they may not only become better 
acquainted with each other and with our problems, but par- 
ticularly in order to have them become accustomed to think in 
terms of the Jewish community program as a whole, rather 
than in terms of the specific part thereof on which they happen 
to be working. 

In the same way it is important that your Executive Com- 
mittee meet, from time to time, with the Presidents of our 
Societies to give more than passing consideration to those 
affairs which are of common concern. 

Your Executive Committee has large and varied responsi- 
bilities, which have been increasing annually. Frequently 
some of the members are necessarily absent from the City for 
extended periods, reducing the number of those who can at a 
given time heed our problems. When you consider that our 
Committee has at best but nine members, you will see that on 
many occasions it is often left to a limited few to dispose 
of matters affecting the entire philanthropic work of the Jewish 
Community. The members of our Committee realize that this 
is both unwise and unfair, and therefore we desire that our 
number be increased from nine to fifteen. A resolution on this 
matter for which we ask your approval will be presented to 
you. 

In concluding this report special words of appreciation are 
due to those members of the Executive Committee whose 
terms have expired, for the splendid effort and devotion with 
which they have served the cause. I refer to Henry Sinsheimer, 
Albert M. Bender, Henry S. Manheim and A. Aronson. They 
deserve the sincere thanks of the entire membership. 

But, after all, our affairs must be administered by those who 
are giving all their time to the work, and I desire to express my 
realization of the earnestness, sincerity and devotion of our 
Secretary, Mr. Meyer H. Levy, and his associate — our Super- 
intendent of Social Service, Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch; each, in his 
own sphere, has during the year covered by this report 
devoted all his energy and capacity to the work of the Federa- 
tion ; neither has allowed any personal consideration to interfere 



11 — 



in any way with his obligations to our organization and to the 
community. 

As President, I shall feel privileged to call upon any and 
all of you for assistance, and with this co-operation, shall hope 
to see a year of further accomplishment in 1922, 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORGAN A. GUNST, 

President. 



— 12 — 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For fiscal year ending December 31, 1921. 

INCOME 
Subscription Account: 

Total subscriptions for 1921 2225,164.07 

Sundry balances due for 1920 37,973.08 

Less written off as uncollectible 1,857.00 6,116.08 

?231,280.15 
Less credit balances for 1921 5,858.32 

3225,421.83 

Amount uncollected at end of 1921 35,082.58 

Less payments in advance for 1922 4,973.00 109.58 

3225,312.25 

Collected a/c Isaias W. Hellman Trust 1,620.97 

Membership Dues: 

Collected by P. H. O. A. & Home Society 627.00 

Collected by Hebrew Free Loan Association 428.00 

Collected by Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 46.50 

Total subscription income 3228,034.72 

Bequests and Donations in Memory: 

Bequest of Isaac Liebes 32,500.00 

Bequest of Fannie S. Haas 2,000.00 

Bequest of David M. Sachs 1,000.00 

Bequest of Sarah Sloss 1,000.00 

Bequest of Sanford E. Seller 250.00 

From Albert M. Bender, in memory of Phillip 

and Augusta Bender 100.00 

From Juda Newman, in memory of Rita 

Newman Jacobs 200.00 

Bequest of Charles Goldman, on account .... 49.21 7,099.21 

Donations (see pages 16-17) 7,165.87 

Memorial Flower Fund Donations (see page 18) 184.50 

Hebrew Free Loan Association: 

Repayments on Farm Grants 8,938.70 

Rehabilitation Committee: 

Repayments on loans 1,906.50 

Bureau for Dependent Aged: 

Contributions towards care of inmates in the Homes for 

Aged 4,505.06 

Interest : 

From Bernhard Schweitzer Memorial Fund. .3 200.00 
From Mrs. Frederick Jacobi Memorial Fund. 100.00 

From Leo Eloesser Memorial Fund 300.00 

From Mrs. Jacob Stern Memorial Fund 200.00 

From Investments 2,278.52 

From Treasurer's Balances 537.35 3,615.87 

Total 3261,450.43 



— 13 — 



EXPENDITURES 

Allotments: 

P. H. 0. A. and Home Society 333,000.00 

Mount Zion Hospital 72,561.15 

Eureka Benevolent Society 74,568.19 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 28,813.62 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 5,823.43 

Hebrew Free Loan Association a/c Farm 

Grants 8,850.00 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 9,411.00 

Board of Jewish Education 8,750.00 

Jewish Committee on State Institutions. . . . 2,250.00 

Rehabilitation Committee 2,840.00 

National Conference of Jewish Social Service 241.62 

Social Service Exchange 240.00 

Bureau of Jewish Social Research 100.00 3247,449.01 



Expenses: 

House expense 3 830.46 

Office expenses and salaries 9,421.84 

Stationery and printing 1,363.18 

Office equipment 81.50 

Collector's commissions 1,000.00 

Canvassing Committee expenses 576.02 13,273.00 



Total 3260,722.01 



Expenditures 3260,722.01 

Income 3261,450.43 

Less Bequests transferred 

to Endowment Fund . . . 7,099.21 254,351.22 



Deficit 3 6,370.79 

ASSETS 
Cash: 

Anglo and London Paris National Bank. . . .3 2,343.16 

Union Trust Company of San Francisco 16,228.13 3 18,571.29 

Accounts Receivable 

Eureka Benevolent Society 3 2,460.66 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 1,306.92 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 604.57 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home 

Society 3,147.84 

Mount Zion Hospital 1,680.56 9,200.55 

Securities — Endowment Fund : 

Par Value Book Value 

5,000 Baltimore and Ohio R. R. Bonds 4% .3 4,150.00 

5,050 U. S. of A. 3rd Liberty Loan Bds. 4^% 4,797.50 

20,550 U. S. of A. 4th Liberty Loan Bds. 4%% 19,573.13 

3,000 Union Pacific R. R. 4% 2,550.00 

Union Trust Company — Savings Deposit. . . 376.16 31,446.79 

— 14 — 



Securities — Memorial Fund: 

Par Value Book Value 

5,000 Spring Valley Water Co. Notes 6%. . . .£4,908.00 
5,000 Spring Valley Water Co. Bonds 4%.. . . 4,600.00 
5,500 U. S. of A. 1st Liberty Loan Bds. 3^% 5,400.00 
2,500 U. S. of A. 4th Liberty Loan Bds. 4*4% 2,398.87 

2,500 Union Pacific R. R. Bonds 4% 2,125.00 

Union Trust Company — Savings Deposits. . . 42.69 3 19,474.56 

Securities — Free Burial Society Trust: 

Par Value Book Value 

2,000 Pacific Tel. and Tel. Co. Bonds 5%. . . .£2,000.00 

250 U. S. of A. 3rd Liberty Loan Bds. 43^% 250.00 

1,000 Los Angeles Railway Bonds 5% 1,000.00 

1,000 Northern Railway of California 5%. . . . 1,000.00 

Union Trust Company — Savings Deposit. . . . 2,195.47 6,445.47 

Securities — Board of Jewish Education Trust: 

Union Trust Company — Savings Deposit 1,485.64 



Total 3 86,624.30 

LIABILITIES 
Trust Funds: 

Board of Jewish Education Trust $ 1,485.64 

Endowment Fund: 

Securities 331, 446.79 

Awaiting investment 7,381.82 38,828.61 

Memorial Fund: 

Securities 319,474.56 

Awaiting investment 25.44 19,500.00 

Free Burial Society: 

Securities 3 6,445.47 

Awaiting investment 210.62 6,656.09 

Total trust funds ' 3 66,470.34 

Allotment Balances Due: 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 3 411.00 

Eureka Benevolent Society 4,568.19 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 613.62 

Mount Zion Hospital 14,561.15 20,153.96 

Total 3 86,624.30 



Our subscription roll on January 1, 1921, numbered 3,061 subscribers 
enrolled, whose subscriptions totalled the sum of 3197,484.00, with in- 
crease secured by the Subscription Committee in 1920 for 1921 amounting 
to 32,349.00, making the total amount enrolled on January 1, 1921, at 
3199,833.00. During the year the Committee on Subscriptions secured 
the following additions: 

40 donations in lieu of increases 3 6,372.01 

367 new subscriptions 7,405.85 

307 increased subscriptions 28,935.00 

Total 342,712.86 

Exclusive of donations, the Subscription Account was increased to the 
— 15 — 



sum of 3236,173.85. Against this amount we unfortunately have to 
report the following losses, to- wit: 

By death 3 8,619.78 

By resignations 1,161.00 

By suspensions 1,229.00 



Total 311,009.78 

so that the earnings from subscriptions for the year 1921 only amounted 
to 3225, 164.07. 

The statistics in reference to the number of subscribers during the 
year were as follows: 

January 1, 1921 — Number enrolled 3,061 

Number of new subscribers 367 



3,428 



Losses — By deaths 48 

By resignations 71 

By suspensions 25 

By transfers 86 230 



January 1, 1922— Number enrolled 3,198 

An analysis of the subscriptions to the Federation on January 1, 1922, 
shows : 

6 subscribers at ?4,000.00 

3 subscribers at 3,000.00 

29 subscribers at 1,000.00 to 32,500.00 



64 subscribers at 


. . 500.00 to 


999.00 


63 subscribers at 


. . 300.00 to 


499.00 


44 subscribers at 


. . 250.00 




56 subscribers at 


. . 200.00 to 


249.00 


232 subscribers at 


. . 100.00 to 


199.00 



497 subscribers— Total subscriptions 3182,770.00 

2,931 subscribers — Total subscriptions 42,394.00 



3,428 3225,164.00 

15% of subscribers produced 81% of the subscriptions. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Audited and Approved: MEYER H. LEVY, 

GREENHOOD AND JANSEN, Secretary. 

Certified Public Accountants. 



DONATIONS 1921 

Adler, Dr. Howard F 310.00 

Anonymous 10.00 

Anonymous, per Maier A. Cahn 10.00 

Argonaut Club Card Game, per M. Bransten 20.00 

Argonaut Club Card Game, per Wm. L. Gerstle 20.00 

Bender, Albert M 12.50 

Blumlein, Jacob 150.00 

Bois, N 2.00 

Brown, Morris 250.00 

— 16 — 



Coblentz & Schwabacher $ 5.00 

Cohen, J 1.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Albert E 10.00 

Cohn, Mayer 50.00 

Congregation Emanu-El 195.12 

Cooper, H. J 50.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. S. L., com. Silver Wedding 250.00 

Emporium Employees 173.50 

Fass, Jacob 2.50 

Frank, Mark 5.00 

Frankel, Mrs. Hannah 5.00 

Fried, William .50 

Gassner, Mrs. Louis 50.00 

Glass, Mrs. 1 1.00 

Greenbaum, Morris 250.00 

Haas, Ben G 5.00 

Harris, Abraham .50 

Harris, M 5.00 

Hart, Julien 250.00 

Heinsheimer, A. M 1,000.00 

Heringhi, Mrs. Louis 7.50 

Islam Temple 100.00 

Jonas, Abraham, com. 40th Wedding Anniversary 250.00 

Judell, H. L. & Co 20.00 

Keller, F 25 

Kirshen, Peter 2.00 

Krotoszyner, Mrs. Martin 25.00 

Kutner, Alfred 100.00 

Levy, Miss Rosaline 1.00 

Liebmann, Joseph H 100.00 

Lindo, Donald 25.00 

Magnes, E. E 12.00 

Meyer, Albert 250.00 

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Walter ' 5.00 

Morse, I. H 20.00 

Piers, Rose K 20.00 

Rehfeld, Julius 5.00 

Reyman, Harold C 20.00 

Rosenwald, Elsie 10.00 

Roth, Lester L 30.00 

Sahlein, Henry 150.00 

Salomon, Maurice 25.00 

Second Hand Clothing Dealers' Association 10.00 

Sinsheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, com. Wedding Anniversary . . . 200.00 

Slosberg, Mr. and Mrs. B 1.00 

Stern, Dr. H. S 5.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 1,000.00 

Stettheimer, W. W 200.00 

Stockwitz, Charles 2.50 

Strassburger, Isaac 250.00 

The T. N. P. C 10.00 

Upham, C. S 1.00 

Walter, Isaac N 250.00 

Walters, Arthur 3.00 

Weil, A. L 1,000.00 

Wolff, Mrs. S 2.00 

Zellerbach, H. H 10.00 



— 17 



MEMORIAL FLOWER FUND 

Gifts to the Memorial Flower Fund have been received during the 
year 1921 from friends wishing to honor the memory of the following: 

Alfred Auerbach Mrs. Helen Hirschman 

Alfred Cohen Dr. Robert Patek 

Sam Dannenbaum Ben Rosenthal 

Mrs. Jeanette Fleishman Edward Henry Stock 

Hazel M. Golden Sylvan H. Susskind 

Louis J. Goldman Daniel Ulman 

Mrs. Esther Hanak Jennie Walter 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Mrs. S. Wand 

Mrs. Laura Hirschfeld Mrs. Hey man Wollenberg 



— 18 





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20 — 



REPORTS 



CONSTITUENT 
SOCIETIES 



— 21 — 



PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM AND 
HOME SOCIETY 



Incorporated July 25, 1871 



OFFICERS 1922 

President 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

Vice-President 

LOUIS S. HAAS 

Treasurer 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Secretary 

MEYER H. LEVY 

436 O'Farrell Street, Telephone Franklin 546 

Honorary Trustees 

Juda Newman Jacob Stern 

Judge M. C. Sloss Samuel I. Wormser 

Trustees 

Term expires May 1st Term expires May 1st 

Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh 1925 Louis S. Haas 1925 

Sidney M. Ehrman 1924 Walter A. Haas 1924 

David R. Eisenbach 1925 Gustav Lachman 1923 

Charles de Young Elkus.. . 1922 Maurice Liebmann 1924 

Alfred I. Esberg 1925 Melvil S. Nickelsburg 1924 

Mortimer Fleishhacker. . . . 1923 Mrs. Ansley K. Salz 1923 

Mrs. J. L. Goodday 1925 Mrs. Jesse H. Steinhart 1924 

Jacob J. Gottlob 1923 

Superintendent of the Orphanage 

DR. SAMUEL LANGER 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1922 

HOUSE COMMITTEE— ORPHANAGE 

LOUIS S. HAAS, Chairman 
Mrs. J. L. Goodday Melvil S. Nickelsburg 

Maurice Liebmann Mrs. Ansley K. Salz 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

J. J. GOTTLOB, Chairman 
Mortimer Fleishhacker Walter A. Haas 

COMMITTEE ON REAL ESTATE AND IMPROVEMENTS 

DAVID R. EISENBACH, Chairman 

— 22 — 



COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT 

MRS. JESSE H. STEINHART, Chairman 

Jacob J. Gottlob 



Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh 
Charles de Young Elkus 



Walter A. Haas 



COMMITTEE ON BEQUESTS AND LEGAL MATTERS 

CHARLES de YOUNG ELKUS, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER, Chairman 
David R. Eisenbach Gustav Lachman 

Alfred I. Esberg Mrs. Jesse H. Steinhart 

COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS, DONATIONS 
AND ENTABLATURES 

CHARLES de YOUNG ELKUS, Chairman 
Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh Melvil S. Nickelsburg 

Louis S. Haas Mrs. Ansley K. Salz 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 

President 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD 
First Vice-President Corresponding Secretary 

MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND MRS. ABRAHAM HAAS 

Second Vice-President Recording Secretary 

MRS. DAVID N. WALTER MISS LUTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 

Treasurer 

MRS. SOPHIE LILIENTHAL 

Board of Managers 



Mrs. Samuel L. Dinkelspiel 
Mrs. Joseph Ehrman 
Mrs. Sidney M. Ehrman 
Mrs. David R. Eisenbach 
Mrs. J. J. Gottlob 
Mrs. Louis Greene 
Mrs. D. J. Guggenhime 
Mrs. Carrie Jacobs 
Mrs. A. Liebenthal 
Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 



Mrs. Leopold Michels 
Mrs. Louis W. Neustadter 
Mrs. Carl Raiss 
Mrs. Daniel Roth 
Mrs. Ludwig Schwab acher 
Mrs. Joseph S. Silverberg 
Mrs. Isaac N. Walter 
Mrs. Harry I. Wiel 
Mrs. Louise Wormser 



Honorary 

Mrs. H. K. Zeimer 



— 23 — 



PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM AND HOME 

SOCIETY 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For fiscal year ending December 31, 1921. 



Schedule A 

GENERAL REVENUE FUND 

INCOME 

Donations: 

James L. Flood 21,000.00 

Congregation Emanu-El in re Steinhart Fund . . 968. 1 2 

Albert M. Bender 310.00 

Sutro & Company 400.00 

Rotary Club of San Francisco 250.00 

Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Dinkelspiel, commemorat- 
ing Silver Wedding 250.00 

Alex Heyman 100.00 

Mrs. Theresa Stone 100.00 

Spring Valley Water Company 50.00 

David Felsenthal 44.00 

A. Cohen, Denver 25.00 

Mrs. Stella G. Simon 25.00 

Max Roe 20.00 

Jesse M. Dryfoos 10.00 

Mrs. Bertha Gottlieb 10.00 

B. Matthews 10.00 

Mrs. Albert E. Cohn 10.00 

Mrs. G. K. Rider, Oakland 10.00 

Uncalled-for Jury Fees, per Auditor Boyle. . . . 18.00 

R. George Green 5.00 

T. Labhard 5.00 

David Lande 10.00 

St. Vincent's Institute, Santa Barbara 5.00 

Paul T. Carroll 5.00 

Holy Family Convent, Oakland 1.00 

Anonymous 1.00 



Bequests: 

Fred C. Talbot 210,000.00 

Interest on same 690,28 

210,690.28 

Jacob C. Zellerbach 5,000.00 

Andrew Rudgear 3,000.00 

Sarah Sloss " 2,500.00 

Louise Epstein 2,427.09 

Samuel W. Heller 2,000.00 

Minna Wunsch 1,500.00 

Fannie S. Haas 1,000.00 

David Jacobs 1,000.00 

Matilda G. Ohlandt 1,000.00 

Esther Levy, Seattle 200.00 

Benjamin Lezer Liveson, Los Angeles 122.40 

Edward B. Carr 25.00 



— 24 



2 3,642.12 



30,464.77 



Donations in Memory: 

Sig. M. Heller, in memory of father 2 100.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities : 

Allotment for fiscal year 1921 33,000.00 

Children's Aid : 

From State of California towards support of 

orphaned and half -orphaned children 2 4,370.99 

From City and County of San Francisco 11,164.93 

From Alameda County 446.46 

From San Joaquin County 540.00 

From parents and relatives 10,346.50 

26,868.88 

Rents: 

From property on Crocker Tract 241.00 

Flower Memorial Fund Donations: 

In memoriam Sam Dannenbaum and Mrs. Esther Moose. . . 15.00 

Interest: 

On bonds and savings bank deposits $ 5,374.61 

Less interest due on Special Funds, viz : 

Herman Behrendt Fund 2200.00 

Leopold Cahn Fund 120.00 

Anspacher Musical Fund 360.00 

Premium Fund 355.44 

Technical Training Fund 312.68 

Mrs. Moritz Meyer Fund .... 60.00 

Girls' Graduation Outfit Fund 40.00 

August Heilbronner Scholar- 
ship Fund 207.49 

1,655.61 

3,719.00 

Life Patronship : 

Charles Simon, Reedley, Calif 250.00 

Total 298,300.77 



EXPENDITURES 

Orphanage maintenance 261,418.80 

Orphanage insurance 4,537.56 

Orphanage taxes 80.81 

266,037.17 

Office expenses 2,916.92 

Total 268,954.09 



Expenditures 268,954.09 

Income 298,300.77 

Less transfers to Endowment 
Fund, bequests and dona- 
tions in memory 30,564.77 

67,736.00 



Deficit 2 1,218.09 

— 25 — 



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

ASSETS 
Bonds: 

Par Value Book Value 

15,000 Market St. Railway Notes 212,000.00 

19,000 Richelieu Investment Co. Bonds 19,000.00 

1,000 U. S. of A. 1st Liberty Loan Bonds. 1,000.00 
300 U. S. of A. 2nd Liberty Loan Bonds. 279.75 
100 U. S. of A. 3rd Liberty Loan Bonds. 100.00 

50 U. S. of A. Victory Loan Bonds 50.00 

1,000 Whatcom Co., State of Washington, 

Bonds 1,000.00 

3 33,429.75 

Cash: 

Commercial Acct. Union Trust Company. . .313,607.62 
Cash with Superintendent 150.00 

13,757.62 

Savings Bank Deposits: 

First Federal Trust Co 3 534.96 

French Savings Bank 780.69 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 1,287.88 

San Francisco Savings and Loan Society.. . . 1,337.64 

Savings Union Bank and Trust Company. . . 1,106.09 

Security Savings Bank 782.11 

Union Trust Company 2,719.48 

8,548.85 

Real Estate: 

Book Valuation 1.00 

Loan on Real Estate 51,891.89 

Total ?107,629.11 



LIABILITIES 
Special Funds: 

Herman Behrendt Fund 3 5,673.25 

Anspacher Musical Fund 9,000.00 

Band Instrument Fund 743.41 

Leopold Cahn Fund 3,447.59 

Girls' Graduation Outfit Fund 1,053.60 

August Heilbronner Scholarship Fund 5,232.49 

Mrs. Moritz Meyer Fund 97.33 

Premium Fund 9,000.83 

Technical Training Fund 8,064.27 

3 42,312.77 

Special Funds — (Building Account) : 

Library Fund 3 550.72 

Guggenhime Fund 5,000.00 

5,550.72 

Bills Payable — Federation of Jewish Charities 3,147.84 

Endowment Fund 56,617.78 

Total 3107,629.11 

— 26 — 



Schedule B. 

NEW ORPHANAGE BUILDING FUND 
RECEIPTS 
Donations Towards Building Operations: 

Rube R. Fogel, New York £30,000.00 

Bequest of Louisa Greenewald 5,000.00 

Mrs. Elsa T. Guggenhime, in memory of 

husband, David J. Guggenhime 5,000.00 

Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland, Mrs. Leon Gug- 
genhime, Mrs. S. W. Ehrman and Mrs. 

Samuel Stiefel, in memory of parents, Mr. 

and Mrs. Bernhard Schweitzer 7,000.00 

J. H. Neustadter 3,000.00 

Mrs. Zelda Meyer, towards "Henry Meyer 

Cottage" 1,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Manfred Bransten 1,000.00 

Mrs. I. Lowenberg, in memory of husband, 

Isidor Lowenberg 1,000.00 

In memory of Rose Lewis 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henrietta Wiel, in memory of husband, 

Lewis P. Wiel 500.00 

J. Barth & Co 105.00 

Albert N. Bender 102.50 

City Coal Co 100.00 

Maurice S. Kuhns 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Ansley K. Salz 100.00 

Carl Raiss & Co 37.50 



Donations Towards Furnishings: 

In memoriam, Isaias W. Hellman, from his 

children $ 5,000.00 

In memoriam, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Furth, 

from their children 5,000.00 

Leo J. Meyberg & Co 300.00 

Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson 250.00 

Miss Etta Reuben 250.00 

Mrs. Sidney M. Ehrman 144.65 

Mrs. William Steinhart 100.00 

Doernbecher Mfg. Co 85.00 

Louis Levy 50.00 

Modin-Ophir Auxiliary, I. O. B. B 25.00 



Donations Towards Playground Equipment: 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln Brown, in 
commemoration of twenty-fifth Wedding 

Anniversary $ 250.00 

Mrs. Sig. Greenebaum and Mrs. Herbert 

Fleishhacker 212.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Max M. Cohn 100.00 

Hayman Krupp 100.00 

Tuesday Sewing Club 80.20 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 25.00 

Mrs. Leopold Michels 60.00 

Mrs. I. Flaum 25.00 

H. L. Judell 20.00 

Fannie S. Heringhi 20.00 

Karl Wolbach 10.00 

— 27 — 



$ 55,045.00 



11,204.65 



Edmond A. Cohen £ 10.00 

Violet Pinkiert , 10.00 

Flower Fund Donations in memory of: 

Mrs. S. Nicholas Jacobs, 

Maurice Schweitzer, 

Mrs. B. B. Galland, 

Abraham Haas, 

Bertha Cohen, 

Alice Landecker, 

Mrs. Julien Hart, 

Samuel W. Heller, 

Mrs. Louisa Wand, 

Mrs. James Hirschman 362.50 

$ 1,284.70 

Donations Towards Library: 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred I. Esberg $ 500.00 

Mrs. Carl Raiss 100.00 

H. A. Miller 25.00 

Mrs. J. A. Heineberg 22.27 

647.27 

Subscriptions 375,875.00 

Rentals 105.00 

Sale of Furniture, Machinery, Etc 2,280.00 

Interest 23,763.04 

£470,204.66 
Advanced from Endowment Funds of Society to cover deficit 

in building operations 207,956.62 

Total 2678,161.28 



Contributions towards playground equipment and furnishings are stil 
coming in. 

EXPENDITURES 

Building Construction: 

Administration Building $ 57,172.22 

Assistant Superintendent's cottage 15,071.11 

Cottages 339,375.71 

Power building 17,310.36 

Power building machinery 16,983.06 

Superintendent's cottage 21,467.51 

2467,379.97 

Grounds : 

Clearing land and grading $ 45,253.07 

Sidewalks and staircase 14,171.94 

Underground installation 27,444.00 

86,869.01 

Construction Expenses: 

Surveying, taxes, etc $ 7,902.25 

Garden and grounds 614.81 

Insurance 1,459.94 

Maintenance and moving 1,622. 56 

Sundries 2,011.32 

136,108.88 

Total construction cost 367,859.865 

— 28 — 



Furnishings $ 40,288.32 

Playground 912.00 

Realty 69,004.55 

Total building operations $5678,064.73 

Library expenditures 96.55 

Total 3678,161.28 

Schedule G. 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

Abraham and Babette Anspacher Musical Fund] 

Tuition expenses of Brass Band. \ 3360.00 

Capital 39,000.00. J 

Leopold Cahn Fund 1 

Sundry expenditures \ 20.00 

Capital 33,447.59. J 

August Heilbronner Scholarship Fund] 

Sundry expenditures. \ 162.30 

Capital 35,232.49. j 

Premium Fund ] 

Sundry expenditures \ 240.80 

Capital 39,000.83. J 

Technical Training Fund] 

Sundry expenditures \ 65.45 

Capital 38,064.27. J 

Respectfully submitted, 
Audited and Approved: MEYER H. LEVY, 

GREENHOOD AND JANSEN Secretary. 

Certified Public Accountants. 



ORPHANAGE SPECIAL DONATIONS 

Anonymous Donations, to Pleasure Fund 3 55.00 

Mrs. A. Roos \ P i nilV i r - ff / 100.00 

Mrs. David R. Eisenbach/ Chanukah Gift j lQQQ 

Joseph D. Hadesman 20.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gottlob] f 20.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Hertz 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. I. Cahn. . . 5.00 

Mrs. E. P. Wiel \ Seder Gift -j 10.00 

Mrs. Louis Schwabacher. . . 15.00 

Richard E. Guggenhime. . . | 20.00 

Mr. and Mrs. M. LiebmannJ ( 10.00 

Mrs. Abraham Haas 100.00 

In memory of Louis Haber, Jr 20.00 

In memory of Alice Landecker 35.50 

Mrs. B. Matthews 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Phillips 2.50 



Mrs. Jacob Stern 

Mrs. Ludwig Schwabacher 

Mrs. Sidney Rhein 

Mrs. Albert E. Cohn 

Mrs. Leopold Michels 



25.00 
15.00 

To Pleasure Fund 1 5.00 

| 10.00 

[ 50.00 

29 — 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



Incorporated November 5, 1887 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1922 



President 

J. B. LEVISON 

Vice-President 

ALBERT E. CASTLE 



Treasurer 

JOSEPH S. SILVERBERG 



Secretary 

MEYER H. LEVY 



DIRECTORS 



Term Expires March 

Frederick Baruch 1923 

Albert E. Castle 1925 

William L. Gerstle 1923 

Sanford L. Goldstein 1925 

Berthold Guggenhime 1925 

Charles W. Haas 1924 

E. S. Heller ' 1923 

Walter S. Heller 1923 

Joseph Hyman 1924 



Term expires March 

Simon Katten 1924 

William Kaufmann 1924 

J. B. Levison 1925 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr 1924 

Albert E. Schwabacher .... 1925 

Louis A. Schwabacher 1925 

Joseph S. Silverberg 1924 

Adolfo Stahl 1923 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 1922 

President 

MRS. I. W. HELLMAN, Jr. 

Vice-President 

MRS. WILLIAM HAAS 

Secretary 

MRS. MARTIN A. MEYER 

Treasurer 



MRS. J. B. L 


EVISON 


Mrs. A. Brown 


Mrs. Charles Rosenbaum 


Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 


Mrs. Milton H. Salz 


Mrs. Alfred I. Esberg 


Mrs. Simon C. Scheeline 


Mrs. Charles Farquharson 


Mrs. Florence F. Schloss 


Mrs. Flora Ganz 


Mrs. Louis A. Schwabacher 


Mrs. S. L. Goldstein 


Mrs. M. Siegel 


Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst 


Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 


Mrs. S. S. Kahn 


Mrs. Adolfo Stahl 


Mrs. M. S. Levy 


Mrs. John I. Walter 


Mrs. H. Lippman 




JUNIOR AUXILIARY 


MRS. LOUIS SLOSS, Jr. . . . 


Chairman 



Mrs. Edward Abbey 
Mrs. Lloyd S. Ackerman 
Mrs. John C. Altman 
Mrs. McKinley Bissinger 
Mrs. Madeline Brandeis 
Miss Agnes Brandenstein 



Mrs. R. Shainwald 



Miss Emilie Greenebaum 
Mrs. Samuel Hyman 
Mrs. Leonard Jacobi 
Mrs. Daniel Koshland 
Mrs. M. S. Nickelsburg 
Mrs. James Ransohoff 



30 — 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1922 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. B. LEVISON, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

Albert E. Castle J. S. Silverberg 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman Louis A. Schwabacher 

Charles W. Haas 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

ALBERT E. SCHWABACHER, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Charles W. Haas Louis A. Schwabacher 

PURCHASING COMMITTEE 

FREDERICK BARUCH, Chairman 
Sanford L. Goldstein William Kaufmann 

COMMITTEE ON KITCHEN AND DIET KITCHEN 

MRS. I. W. HELLMAN, Jr., Chairman 
Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Mrs. Milton H. Salz 

COMMITTEE ON DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

LOUIS A. SCHWABACHER, Chairman 
Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman Walter S. Heller 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

J. S. SILVERBERG, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch Morris Meyerfeld 

COMMITTEE ON NURSES 

CHARLES W. HAAS, Chairman 
Mrs. A. Brown Mrs. William Haas 

Berthold Guggenhime Mrs. Florence Schloss 

Mrs. Louis A. Schwabacher 

COMMITTEE ON PHARMACY, LABORATORY AND X-RAY 

JOSEPH HYMAN, Chairman 
Mrs. Charles Farquharson Mrs. Flora Ganz 

Sanford L. Goldstein 

COMMITTEE ON LAUNDRY AND LINEN ROOM 

SIMON KATTEN, Chairman 
Mrs. C. W. Rosenbaum Mrs. S. C. Scheeline 

Mrs. Martin A. Meyer Mrs. S. Sussman 

HOUSE STAFF 1922 

Superintendent 

Dr. Louis Bernheim 

Resident Physician 

Dr. Elwood R. Olsen 

Internes 

Max L. Rabinowitz Charles Firestone 

Simon U. Luban Joseph Bellas 

John E. Neville 

— 31 — 



Anesthetists 

Miss Gertrude Noble Miss Gene Townsend 

Pathologists 

Dr. E. W. Simmons Miss Marian Farrington 

Radiographers 

Miss Maude Tanner Miss Celia Lox, Assistant 

Pharmacists 

Miss Agnes Lainer Maurice Saltzman 

Training School for Nurses 

Miss Ann Roberts, R. N Acting Superintendent 

Miss Ella MacDermott Instructress 

Miss Grace A. Bean, R. N . . . .Night Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Frieda Koenig Acting Assistant Superintendent 

Purchasing Agent 

H. C. Bailey 

Dietitian 

Miss Grace Bowden 

Matron 

Mrs. Sallie Liebman 



DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Director of Dispensary and Social Service 

Miss Josephine Abraham 

Dispensary Assistants 
Mrs. Sophie Mersing Miss Minna Meininger 

Dental Assistant 

Miss Estelle Bachman 

Visiting Nurses 

Miss Rose Goodman .... Mount Zion Hospital District 
Mrs. Elizabeth Diggins San Bruno District 

Visiting Physician 

Dr. Samuel Welfield 

Dispensary Office 

Miss Mary Lewis Medical Statistician 

Leone Ettling Assistant 

Miss Martha Buck Clinic Historian 

— 32 — 



SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 



Mrs. J. M. Jacobi 

Mrs. Claire De Grucchi 

Mrs. Louis Goldman 

Mrs. Herman Loewenstein 

Miss Helen Son 

Miss Helen Levy 

Miss Arline Rosenblatt 

Miss Nita Nieto 

Miss Rosenstock 

Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Mrs. John I. Walter 

Mrs. Wm. Waterman 



Miss Elizabeth Jacobi 
Mrs. Lawrence Bachman 
Mrs. Albert Ehrman 
Mrs. G. H. Frutiger 
Miss Blanche Son 
Miss Martha Blumenthal 
Miss Flora Rosenfeld 
Miss Katherine Corrigan 
Mrs. Hirschfeld 
Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst 
Mrs. I. W. Hellman 
Miss Edith Cohen 



SAN BRUNO DISTRICT DISPENSARY 

Miss Helen Baum Mrs. Henry L. Mayer 

Mrs. Jacob Schwartz 

VISITING STAFF 

Surgery 

Dr. Charles G. Levison Dr. Harold Brunn 

Dr. Julius Rosenstirn Emeritus 

Dr. E. J. Casper Adjunct 

Medicine 

Dr. E. O. Jellinek Dr. Samuel H. Hurwitz 

Dr. Adolph Nahman Associate 

Dr. William C. Voors anger Advisory 

Pediatrics 

Dr. E. C. Fleischner 
Dr. Clain F. Gelston Adjunct 

Obstetrics 

Dr. Louis C. Breitstein 

Dr. Cavins Deter Hart Adjunct 

Dr. Reginald Knight Smith Advisory 

Eye 

Dr. Aaron S. Green 
Dr. Robert D. Cohn Emeritus 

Ear-Nose-Throat 

Dr. Herbert J. Cohn 

Geni to- Urinary 

Dr. William E. Stevens 
Dr. Louis C. Jacobs Adjunct 

Dermatology 

Dr. David Friedlander 

Orthopedics 

Dr. Lionel D. Prince 

Neurology 

Dr. W. F. Beerman 



Dr. Lloyd Bryan 



X-Ray 



Dr. H. E. Ruggles 



— 33 — 



DISPENSARY STAFF 
Surgery and Gynecology 

Dr. Charles G. Levison Dr. Harold Brunn 

Dr. E. J. Casper Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer 

Dr. Roy Morris Dr. M. Heppner 

Dr. Wm. Holzberg Dr. Walter Frohlich 

Medical 

Dr. E. 0. Jellinek Dr. Samuel H. Hurwitz 

Dr. Adolph Nahman Dr. Allan Cohn 

Eye 

Dr. Aaron S. Green 
Dr. Robert D. Cohn Emeritus 

Ear-Nose-Throat 

Dr. Herbert J. Cohn Dr. W. O. Montgomery 

Obstetrics 

Dr. Louis C. Breitstein Dr. Cavins Deter Hart 

Orthopedics 

Dr. Lionel D. Prince 

Genito-Urinary 

Dr. William E. Stevens 
Dr. Louis C. Jacobs Dr. A. Epsteen 

Neurological 

Dr. W. F. Beerman Dr. M. Hirschfeld 

Mental Hygiene 

Dr. Lillien J. Martin Mrs. Claire De Grucchi 

Derma tological 
Dr. David Friedlander 

Pediatrics 

Dr. E. C. Fleischner Dr. Clain F. Gelston 

Dr. H. Crabtree 

Masseuse 

Mrs. T. Mishkin 

Dental 

Dr. F. E. Goddell Dr. May Scott 

Optician 

Mr. K. Knutsen 

Visiting Physician and Clinician for San Bruno 

Dr. Samuel E. Welfield 



— 34 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

I have not prepared a report for this meeting, for two rea- 
sons: In the first place, I have not been doing so for several 
years past, and in the second place, we expect to have, in 
March, the joint meeting with the other constituent societies 
of the Federation, at which a detailed report will, of course, 
be presented. I shall therefore submit only the salient 
features of our work for your information at this time. 

I am grateful to say in the first place that we have to record 
no deaths during the past year, either on the Board of Direc- 
tors, the Ladies' Auxiliary or the staff, which is something that 
we should feel very thankful for. 

The work that the hospital has done during 1921 is most 
interesting in many respects. In 1921 our total earnings, in- 
cluding dispensary, reached the figure of $250,000.00, in round 
numbers, against 1920, $187,000.00, and in 1919, $156,000.00. 
From this you can see that our earnings have increased almost 
one hundred thousand dollars in the two years. The total 
income from all sources, which includes $72,561.15 received 
from the Federation, but exclusive of endowments, bequests, 
etc., amounted to $326,000.00 against $273,000.00 in 1920. 
The important bequests and endowments that we received 
during the year were: $2,000.00 from the estate of Emil 
Schmoll, $1,000.00 from the estate of Fannie S. Haas, $200.00 
from Esther Levy of Seattle and $122.40 from Benjamin Lezer 
Liveson. 

We received for our special new nurses' building fund from 
the estate of Isaias W. Hellman, $5,000.00 ; $5,000.00 from Mrs. 
Jacob Stern in memory of her daughter; and $5,000.00 from 
S. W. and Walter S. Heller, in memory of their wife and mother, 
which gives the total I have already touched on. 

Reference to the new nurses' home leads me to say something 
at this point on the subject of our building projects. You 
have heard for the last two or three years at our annual meet- 
ings reference to the necessity for a new nurses' home. I don't 
have to say to you that this is more urgent now than ever. 
However, unfortunately we have made no real headway, for 
reasons which I will refer to in a moment. The directors have 
been giving very serious consideration to this whole question 
of new buildings. The demand for private rooms has been 
very great. In fact, our Superintendent has told us frequently 
that we could fill double as many rooms as we have. The 
change in management of the Adler Sanatorium in connection 
with the extraordinary demand for rooms has led the directors 
to give very serious consideration during the past year to the 
question of another private pavilion as well as the question of 
building the new nurses' home. I might add that we are ac- 

— 35 — 



tually at work investigating and considering the matter and 
will probably have a definite report from the committee within 
the next two or three months, after which it will be deter- 
mined whether or not we will go ahead with the building. In 
other words, if the committee sees a way of financing it that 
will justify putting it forward, we will go to the Federation for 
its approval. Until that time we can do nothing. I should 
say on this point that the view of the directors is unanimously 
that we must not go out into the community for money. 
There have been too many demands made on the community, 
and unless we can finance it through a mortgage loan, nothing 
will be done at this time. 

It is possible that we may conclude to build only the new 
pay wing, which can be financed, I think, without serious diffi- 
culty, leaving the new nurses' home for the future. Personally, 
I should very much regret such a decision, as our new nurses' 
home is becoming more and more necessary all the time, 
especially in view of the fact, as you know, that practically 
all of the local hospitals except Mount Zion have modern up- 
to-date nurses' homes. 

I wandered away from my figures when I referred to the 
building fund, as I am so interested in it. Our expenditures dur- 
ing 1921 amounted to $335,000.00 against $307,000.00 in 
1920. Our deficit for the year was $9,900.00. We have had to 
impinge on our endowments to make up this deficit, which 
has not been done ordinarily. We cannot, of course, and do 
not use endowments given for specific purposes. I think we 
can feel that Mount Zion as a hospital is going ahead splendid- 
ly, particularly in the work that we are organized to do, by 
which I mean taking care of the poor sick. Of course, we give 
our time and money primarily that the poor may receive the 
best possible medical and surgical treatment. The pay de- 
partment interests us only in so far as it enables us to take care 
of the poor. The ideal situation would be for us to have income 
enough to devote ourselves exclusively to the care of poor 
sick, but this we cannot do. 

We now come to the work of the dispensary, which is 
becoming more and more important, for the reason in the first 
place that it is where all our preventive work is done, and 
secondly, that all free patients enter the hospital through the 
dispensary, or clinic as it is popularly called. In 1921 we 
treated, in round numbers, 25,000 cases in the dispensary, 
against 23,000 the previous year. Just think of that — 25,000 
cases in the dispensary! We have there six paid workers and 
our Superintendent and two visiting nurses. I do not know 
whether all of you realize just what the visiting nurses do. 
Primarily they respond to calls from homes of people who are 
unable to come to the clinic or for a variety of reasons do not 
come, and also advise and assist convalescents. Those two 
visiting nurses made 6,320 visits or over 500 visits a month 

— 36 — 



during the past year. One of them, I should explain, has an 
automobile. I might explain further that the work done by the 
San Bruno clinic with which we are working in conjunction is 
included. In fact, it is considered and handled as a branch of 
our dispensary. In addition to the six paid workers, we have 
an average of about eight volunteer workers daily; ladies who 
come to us and devote their time to the work in the clinic. 
The earnings in the dispensary during 1921 were $20,000.00 
against $14,300.00 the preceding year. This is a very interest- 
ing and a most important feature from a sociological point of 
view. Poor people coming to the clinic for free treatment, if 
you please, upon whom it is the duty of our social service 
workers to impress the propriety of giving something for their 
treatment so as to enable them to keep out of the pauper class. 
Nothing is demanded from them, as the suggestions are made 
in a considerate and kindly manner. The earnings from this 
source amounted to $20,000.00 against $14,300.00 the preced- 
ing year, as I have already said, and that in the face of the fact 
that unemployment has increased so much during 1921 as 
compared with 1920. 

There are a number of interesting features of this work 
which I think should be called to your attention. For example, 
the splendid work done through the income derived from the 
Rosenberg Fund. As you know, this fund is $20,000.00, the 
income from which was to be applied to convalescents, and I 
will give one or two typical cases simply by way of illustration : 
A boy, threatened with tuberculosis, sent out of town. Girls 
sent to the country where they can be built up physically ; and 
to give you an idea of how carefully the income from this fund 
is husbanded, I need only say that the entire income was not 
spent during 192 1 and it is not necessary to add that the income 
from $20,000.00 is not very large. 

One item in the dispensary which is becoming a more 
important one and a very expensive one to the hospital, as we 
have no special fund from which to draw, is special nursing of 
free patients. If free patients come into the hospital and are 
desperately ill, they must have exactly the same treatment as 
pay patients, and it is not at all unusual to put two nurses on a 
case if the doctor says the case demands it — a day and a night 
nurse — for which the hospital is paying. Here is a wonderful 
field which I sincerely hope may be developed. 

I want to say while on the subject of free patients that we 
have a capacity all told of about 80 pay and 80 free beds, a total 
of 160 beds in the hospital. You may have noticed in the news- 
papers that at a recent meeting of all the social service agencies 
in the city, special reference was made, in a very gratifying 
manner, to the free work done at Mount Zion, especially when 
compared with what is called free work at other institutions 
and which as a rule is not free work at all. Speaking of the 
work done in the hospital, there were, during 1921, 1,991 

— 37 — 



free patients treated who were given 18,087 days' treatment, 
against 1,903 in 1920 w T ho received 18,441 days' treatment. I 
might explain to those who may not exactly understand what 
* 'days' treatment" means, that we have an increase in the 
number of patients received and a decrease in the number of 
days' treatment given. This means the hospital officials are 
watching carefully to see that patients are moved so that no 
one is in the hospital longer than necessary. We frequently 
find that some of these people are so much more comfortable 
in the hospital than they are at home that it is hard to get them 
out. In 1921 we treated 4,194 private patients against 3,974 
in 1920. Here the number of days' treatment is not of so 
much importance. That is all that I can think of in connection 
with the hospital work. 

The nursing question has become a very difficult one for us. 
You may have noticed in the papers recently a reference to the 
cost of nursing as a result of the laws that have been passed on 
the subject. The consternation with which we viewed the 
enactment of the eight-hour law for nurses may be remembered 
but this was only the start. There is now a rule to the effect 
that probationers for the first three months of their probation 
can only work four hours a day. Just think of it! The rest of 
the time they are supposed to be studying. Of course, you do 
not have to be told they are not studying. The result has been 
a very difficult situation for hospitals with training schools. 
This you will understand better when I tell you we are em- 
ploying nineteen graduate nurses in the hospital at the present 
time. We should not have half that number in a hospital this 
size if we had a training school as we used to have it. In fact 
this whole training school question has been difficult since the 
war when women found so many other means of making a live- 
lihood which paid better, etc., etc. To illustrate, during 1921, 
60 students entered the training school, and from that number 
but 36 have remained. In other words, 24 of the girls that came 
in during 1921 went out before the close of the year. Some 
were found unfit to do the work and were dropped by the 
Superintendent ; others gave it up on account of ill health, and, 
of course, some discover that it is not as romantic and heroic 
as they had thought it. The fact remains, however, that of 
sixty, twenty-four have gone out. We have 72 students in 
our training school at present against 67 at the beginning of 
last year and that brings us again to the proposition of the 19 
graduate nurses; but four of the nineteen are graduates of 
Mount Zion. Our ambition should be to give our own gradu- 
ates the preference, but they seem to prefer private work which 
carries better compensation and more liberty. In short, our 
training school is a difficult problem for us and is made more 
difficult by the fact that we are not housing the nurses properly. 

During the year we have had several resignations from our 
board, and the directors have made a determined effort to find 

— 38 — 



young men to go on the board, in which we have been signally 
successful. Of course, some of us are getting old faster than we 
like to admit, but it must be recognized that sooner or later we 
must make room for young men, and every vacancy on the 
Mount Zion board should be filled by a young man. 

Referring to the administration of the hospital at the hands 
of Dr. Hirschberg, the best evidence of his efficiency is that we 
have so few complaints. If there is any organization where one 
hears of shortcomings quicker than in a hospital, I do not 
know what it is. Our Superintendent of nurses, Miss Fox, left 
last year to take another position elsewhere and we put in 
her stead Miss Briggs, who had been with us for a time as 
instructress in the training school. The staff are, as a whole, 
working as they always have done, with enthusiasm and con- 
scientiousness. 

Our Domestic Science Department Mrs. Liebman is han- 
dling as efficiently as she has now for some years. 

The great difficulty we are having both in our X-ray 
Department and laboratory on account of cramped quarters 
forces us to have in mind continually the necessity for ex- 
pansion. 

A year ago I asked the directors to relieve me of the respon- 
sibilities of the presidency and it was not done. At the final 
meeting of the board the other day I made an earnest appeal 
again to be relieved and again I was put off by the promise that 
by this time next year there would be another president. I 
want to repeat what I said last year, that I want to retire 
simply because I think it is for the best interests of the institu- 
tion, but so long as you desire me to remain on the board, I 
will be only too glad to stay. I think, however, someone else 
should take the presidency. 

This concludes my report to you of what has been done 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. B. LEVISON, 

President. 



— 39 — 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

INCOME 

Bequests: 

Emil Schmoll $ 2,000.00 

Fannie S. Haas 1,000.00 

Esther Levy, Seattle 200.00 

Benjamin Lezer Liveson 122.40 

3 3,322.40 

Donations: 

Mrs. L. A. Schwabacher, commemorating 
confirmation of daughter :....$ 100.00 

Mrs. Stella G. Simon 25.00 

Mrs. Kalman Haas and daughter, in mem- 
ory of Abraham Haas 20.00 

M. Hall McAllister 10.00 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 4.00 

159.00 

Memorial Bed Donations: 

From Mrs. Sidney Schuman and Mrs. Abe Koshland for 
endowment of two beds in memory of Henry and Rose 
Wangenheim 4,000.00 

Memorial Bed Donations — Maternity Ward: 

From Charles W. Haas, in memory of wife, Fannie S. Haas . . 2,000.00 

New Nurses' Home Building Fund: 

Bequest of Isaias W. Hellman 3 5,000.00 

Mrs. Jacob Stern, in memory of daughter, 

Fannie Stern Haas 5,000.00 

S. W. and Walter S. Heller, in memory of 

wife and mother 5,000.00 

15,000.00 

Hospital Earnings: 

Rooms 3 96,651.99 

Wards •. 46,115.08 

Operating Room 32,527.32 

Nurses' Board 16,935.24 

X-Ray Laboratory 9,431.44 

Pathological Laboratory 11,304.43 

Pharmacy 9,016.95 

Phones and Postage 1,023.99 

Extra Diets 1,162.01 

Maternity Department 7,544.58 

Sundries 1,839.26 

3233,552.29 
Less written off as uncollectible 3,891.06 

229,661.23 

Dispensary Earnings: 

Semi-Private Patients 313,980.25 

X-Rays 851.00 

Pathological Laboratory 834.05 

Pharmacy 3,242.36 

Optical Clinic 95.72 

— 40 — 



Orthopedic Clinic $ 243.00 

Dental Clinic 344.85 

Nurses 218.90 

San Bruno Clinic 119.05 

3 19,929.18 

Interest : 

On Treasurer's Balances $ 295.48 

On U. S. of A. Liberty Loan Bonds 96.33 

On Ignatz Steinhart Bequest 3,004.17 

3,395.98 

Federation of Jewish Charities : 

a/c allotment for 1921 72,561.15 

Total ?350,028.94 

EXPENDITURES 
Hospital Maintenance: 

Administration 326,562.38 

Professional care of Patients 84,072.55 

Departmental Expense 62,295.83 

Steward's Department 76,549.21 

General Expense 38,165.78 

Store Room Expense 4,829.33 



3292,475.08 
Dispensary Maintenance: 

Salaries 314,060.75 

Supplies 4,220.79 

San Bruno Clinic 1,392.27 

19,673.81 

Hospital Equipment 4,989. 14 

Dispensary Equipment 702.87 

Hospital Improvements 7,023.48 

Insurance 2,672.41 

Taxes 4,456.18 

Sundry Expense 1,825.00 

Office Expense 1,789.43 

Total 3335,607.40 



Expenditures 3335,607.40 

Income 3350,028.94 

Less Endowment Income: 

Bequests 3 3,322.40 

Mem. Bed Don 6,000.00 

New Nurses' Home 

Don 15,000.00 

24,322.40 

325,706.54 



Deficit 3 9,900.86 



ASSETS 

Cash with Treasurer 3617.09 

Cash at Hospital 353.38 

3 970.47 

— 41 — 



Accounts Receivable: 

Patients' Accounts 218,633.46 

Hospital Special Funds 714.83 

Federation of Jewish Charities 14,561.15 

? 33,909.44 

Hospital Property — Book Valuation: 

Realty $ 17,598.50 

Improvements 148,662.05 

Equipment 42,788.12 

209,048.67 

Securities — Convalescent Fund: 

U. S. of A. Victory Loan Bonds £19,475.00 

Savings Deposit, Union Trust Co 2,198.19 

21,673.19 

Securities — New Nurses' Home Bldg. Fund: 

U. S. of A. Third Liberty Loan Bonds $ 917.50 

U. S. of A. Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds 16,710.00 

Savings Bank Deposit, Union Trust Co 2,979.84 

20,607.34 

Total 3286,209.11 

LIABILITIES: 

Hospital Bills Payable $ 33,395.48 

Federation of Jewish Charities 1,680.56 

Sundry Special Funds 754.07 

Trust Funds: 

Convalescent Fund 21,798.76 

New Nurses' Home Bldg. Fund 20,607.34 

Capital Account: 

Endowment Fund 3114,596.85 

General Fund 93,376.05 

207,972.90 

Total 3286,209.11 



Respectfully submitted, 
Audited and Approved MEYER H. LEVY, 

GREENHOOD AND JANSEN Secretary. 

Certified Public Accountants 

SPECIAL DONATIONS RECEIVED AT HOSPITAL 
Social Service Fund 

Ladies* Auxiliary $ 2.00 

Dr. M. Heppner 5.00 

Dr. W. Holzberg 5.00 

Mr. A. Sugarman 12.00 

Mrs. Max Wolf 7.50 

Miss Wheeler 2.00 

Dr. Shenson 10.00 

Caspar Riese 3.00 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 5.00 

Mrs. Herman Loewenstein 10.00 

Mrs. Florence Schloss 100.00 

In memory of Louis Goldman 10.00 

Anonymous * 12.50 

In memory of Abraham Haas 5.50 

In memory of Louis Haber 5.00 

— 42 — 



CAPACITY OF THE HOSPITAL 
Private Service 

Private Rooms 46 

Private ward beds 36 

Cribs for babies in maternity service 25 

Total 107 

Free Service 

4 Wards, 12 beds each 48 

Maternity beds 5 

Tonsil beds 6 

Children's beds 6 

Cribs in Free Maternity Service 5 

Cribs in Children's Service 3 

Total 73 

Total number of beds in Hospital 180 



— 43 — 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



DIRECTOR DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT REPORT 

It is always interesting to watch the development of an 
organization from a comparative standpoint; with seven years 
of social service work in connection with dispensary work, it 
seems that a comparative study of this period might prove of 
interest to our many friends and benefactors. The past year 
has been one of almost ''smooth sailing." There was but one 
serious handicap, which presented itself in the form of "UN- 
EMPLOYMENT"; this was due to the prevalent strike 
conditions in the city, first that among the iron workers and 
secondly when all the building trades unions went on general 
strike. The question of unemployment among a real working 
class of people strikes the hardest blow that can be counted; 
this condition sent to our dispensary for free treatment many 
families who heretofore had been dependent on their own 
resources. This strike existed for many months and made a very 
strong imprint on the general family income; there is no doubt 
that the tremendous increase of new cases in 1921 over 1920 
may be put to this cause — 2,550 new cases as against 2,262 
and 22,291 old cases as against 20,655, or an increase of 288 
new cases and 1,636 old cases, a total of 1,914 more cases 
cared for in 1921 than 1920. The following tabulation shows 
seven years' work: 



No. New Cases 
No. Old Cases . 
Total No. Cases 



1914 



3,388 

7,036 

10,424 



1915 



3,641 
12,081 
15,659 



1916 



3,723 
20,163 

23,885 



1917 



3,037 
20,809 
23,846 



1918 



2,068 
17,010 
19,078 



1919 



1,939 
17,112 
19,051 



1920 



2,262 
20,655 
22,917 



1921 



2,550 
22,291 

24,841 



The very keen interest shown by the Dispensary Committee 
has been the source of much comfort and help in handling all 
the weighty questions pertaining to dispensary affairs. These 
meetings are called regularly on the third Wednesday after- 
noon of each month, but the individual members are never too 
busy to respond to a special meeting called at a moment's 
notice. To the following committee members is the dispensary 
grateful for their splendid spirit of co-operation : 

Mr. Louis A. Schwabacher Chairman 

Mr. J. B. Levison President of Mount Zion Hospital 

Mr. Walter Heller Director of Mount Zion Hospital 

Dr. Samuel B. Hirschberg Superintendent of Mount Zion Hospital 

Dr. Chas. G. Levison Representing Staff of Mount Zion Hospital 

Mrs. Albert Ehrman. . Director of Mount Zion Hospital — Ladies Auxiliary 
Mrs. Albert Rosenbaum . . Member Ladies Auxiliary of Mount Zion Hospital 

— 44 — 



Mrs. Louis Goldman Social Service Dept. Mount Zion Dispensary- 
Mrs. Lawrence Bachman .... Social Service Dept. Mount Zion Dispensary- 
Mrs. Herman Lowenstein. . . . Social Service Dept. Mount Zion Dispensary- 
Miss Josephine Abraham Director of Dispensary and Social Service 

The greatest progress noted in any one specific department 
is that of the Baby Welfare. This health centre is held every 
Wednesday afternoon and is most ably handled by Dr. C. F. 
Gelston as medical examiner and adviser. Mrs. Bessie Dig- 
gins, registered nurse, who gives special attention to the weigh- 
ing and measuring of every baby and who also has the all- 
important task of doing the "follow-up" work on all these 
children, and Mrs. L. Bachman and Mrs. L. Goldman, who 
handle the social service end of this work and are untiring in 
their efforts — and last but by no means least is Miss Frances 
Baruch, who has done the registering of all the children. With 
the beginning of this health centre in August, 1920, from six to 
ten children were examined each afternoon but as the time 
advanced from twenty-five to thirty-five children were exam- 
ined. This tremendous growth has continued from the spring 
of 1 92 1 to the end of the year. The keen interest of the mothers 
in their marked regularity is proof alone of the results accom- 
plished in this work. In this connection too much praise can- 
not be given Dr. Lillien J. Martin, who, with her assistant, Mrs. 
Claire DeGrucchy, and an able corps of students, handles the 
psychological tests. The general need of baby welfare work 
has grown to such an extent that a Health Centre has been 
established in connection with the San Bruno Dispensary. 
Dr. C. F. Gelston and Mrs. Bessie Diggins, assisted by Mrs. 
Jack Walter, have charge of this work, and whereas this health 
centre is but in its infancy it already bids fair to make the 
same strides that the Mount Zion Health Centre has done. 
For your kind consideration the following statistics show the 
action of the Health Centre at Mount Zion Dispensary from 
January, 1921, to December, 1921, inclusive: 

Number of Clinic days (Wednesday afternoon) 48 

Number New Cases 210 

Total Number Cases 325 

Number Clinic Visits 1,066 

Average number daily cases 22 

Average number new cases 5 

Average number daily cases 27 

What appears to be the most valuable and necessary part of 
the work in connection with the out-patient department is the 
very intensive work done by our two visiting nurses, Mrs. Bes- 
sie Diggins, who visits for the San Bruno District and does 
follow-up for Mount Zion Health Centre, and Miss Rose Good- 
man, who does all other visiting exclusive of the San Bruno 

— 45 — 



District. Together these nurses made 6,430 visits during the 
past year. As we know that many social problems are very often 
the result of medical problems, it is the task of these invaluable 
workers to make thorough investigations along the lines of hous- 
ing, sleeping quarters, diet, clothing and such else as might have 
to do with the physical, mental and moral welfare of the fam- 
ily. There is an ever constant demand from these homes on 
the time of these nurses ; however, their time is never too much 
occupied to make a ready response, thereby often alleviating 
many temporary ills and troubles. It is not only the physical 
that must be considered, but only too often is the nurse called 
upon to help decide some very weighty family question. This 
service is one that shows more returns from the standpoint of 
real rehabilitation than any other angle of the work. In con- 
nection with home visiting, the splendid work done by our 
visiting physician must not be overlooked — Dr. Welfield made 
346 visits in the home. 

In discussing dispensary statistics the work would by no 
means be complete without a report of the wonderful piece of 
work done in the San Bruno Dispensary. During the year 
1,384 cases were cared for; of this number 206 were new cases. 
It is too early to attempt a report on the Health Centre at San 
Bruno ; suffice it to say that the beginning has been a splendid 
one. The San Bruno Dispensary is ably cared for by Dr. 
Samuel Welfield as clinician, Mrs. Bessie Diggins as nurse 
and visitor, and Mrs. Henry Mayer, Mrs. J. Schwarz and Miss 
Helen Baum as social workers. 

The problem of hospital convalescents, always such a ques- 
tion as to their future care, has been wonderfully taken care 
of through the "Lena Rosenberg Convalescent Fund/' said 
fund established in 1920 by the Messrs. Rosenberg in memory 
of their beloved mother. Previous to this doctors and social 
workers were taxed with the weighty question, "How are we to 
take care of post-hospital cases requiring special care?" This has 
now been solved and the doctor's recommendation for special 
relief is immediately acted upon. The following specific cases 
may give you an idea of the type of case assisted through this 
fund : 

Mrs. G., a patient in the hospital for many weeks, suffering 
with inflammatory rheumatism, was recommended to the 
springs where she might have the advantage of mud baths; 
this was carried out and after four weeks the patient returned 
so much improved that she has not had to return to the clinic. 
A young chap, aged twelve, with a predisposition to lung 
trouble was sent to the Preventorium at San Mateo, where he 
remained for a period of three months. Mrs. S., a chronic 
sufferer from asthma, was advised that a climatic change was 
necessary for her improvement ; she was sent to a sanatorium 
at Ross, where she remained for four months. And so on for 
many other equally important cases. Mount Zion Hospital 

— 46 — / 



is surely blessed in having such benefactors. Right here let 
it be said that a fond hope is being entertained that the same 
blessing may come to the institution in the nature of a "Special 
Nurses' Fund." 

It has been the aim of the Dispensary that the spirit of 
social service be ever present among all clinic patients, whether 
they be clinic visitors or hospital patients. Daily visits to 
ward patients in the hospital are made — among these patients 
every type and class is represented, many of them having 
enjoyed "better days" at some' previous time. It is to this 
particular type that the kind word and personal attention 
means more than words can tell. Whatever is within human 
power is done to satisfy a request or a desire. The real signifi- 
cance of these daily visits is best shown by the joyous expres- 
sion of greeting after a few days' vacation. 

The Dental Department, with its ever-growing demands, 
continues to do splendid work. The best proof of the good 
work accomplished through the work of dental prophylaxis is 
to quote figures — in 1920, 2,422 cases were taken care of, 
whereas in 1921, 2,065 cases were treated, thereby proving 
conclusively that the lessons in the care of the mouth, had been 
taken home. Of this great number of cases treated 371 had 
never been to a dental department before — out of 2,065 cases 
treated, 1,141 were operative cases. If it were not for the 
amount of good accomplished through the educational end of 
this work, it would be a tremendous problem how to take care 
of the number of applicants. It is to Miss Estelle Bachman, 
social worker and assistant in the dental clinic, that the credit 
is due for this fine piece of educational work. The amount of 
free work done in this department, 311 free orders, amounted to 
$1,069.00. 

Without co-operation, work of this type cannot be carried 
to a successful end. This quality is omnipresent throughout 
the working staff of the hospital, and the constituent societies of 
the Federation. There is the fine piece of work carried on in 
the office of the Eureka Benevolent Society, under the able 
guidance of Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch — it is through his office that 
many of our departments are virtually "fed" — the field workers 
from this office form the background for our social service work 
and constitute the connecting link between the hospital and 
the home. 

To the Superintendent of our hospital is the dispensary 
more than grateful for his splendid interest and hearty co- 
operation — no question is too weighty or too trivial to give it 
his time and thought. 

Our hospital staff in its daily work in the clinic accom- 
plished work the immensity of which figures alone can verify. 
Almost every department of medicine holds a daily clinic — 
these clinics are presided over by a "chief of service" and assist- 
ants. What a privilege it is for these unfortunate people to 

— 47 — 



have such an opportunity to make known their complaints. 
It is not only the physical complaint that the doctor must 
listen to, but he must also become the advisor in family affairs. 
Words are in vain to express to these splendid men and women 
due praise and appreciation. 

Of all the departments attached to the hospital and upon 
which the clinic is most dependent is the pharmacy. Unless 
one has been present during a busy clinic morning and has 
seen what it means to get out some forty prescriptions, in a 
couple of hours, the splendid efficiency of the drug department 
cannot be appreciated. It is to its most capable leader, Miss 
Agnes Lainer, and her willing and ambitious assistant, that 
all this credit is due. Perhaps it will mean just a bit more to 
my readers to state that during the past year 5,584 prescrip- 
tions have been filled for the clinic. Then there is the X-ray 
department, the laboratory, the dispensary office where all 
hospital records are kept, patients admitted and discharged, 
also the supply room, the house-keeping department, the 
purchasing department, upon all of these the clinic depends in 
one way or another and from whom only courtesy and prompt 
action has been received. 

The splendid co-operation of the nurses' training school has 
helped materially to facilitate work in the dispensary. These 
girls are untiring in their efforts to please and comfort. There 
have been some very sad times during the past year when the 
nursing work was very much handicapped through the great 
amount of illness among the student nurses, thereby throwing 
the burden of the work on a few. In spite of this stress of 
time, work went on with the same cheerful spirit. It is due to 
the work of the superintendent of nurses and the supervising 
nurses on the floors that this work has been accomplished. 

Many acts of kindness and gifts have been made the dis- 
pensary in the past year. One of the most splendid is that done 
by the Ladies' Auxiliary in their monthly contribution to the 
social service emergency fund of twenty dollars, also many 
complete layettes made by their members. Another beautiful 
piece of work was done by the Emanuel Guild and handled by 
Mrs. Cora S. Kramer in the distribution of Chanuka gifts to 
some fifty children. It is needless to say how many little hearts 
were made glad. Other friends to whom the department is 
indebted for various acts of kindness and generosity are the 
following : 

Mrs. Albert Ehrman Many Gifts of Clothing 

Mrs. Louis Haber Children's Clothing 

Mrs. D. G. Guggenhime Crochet Baby Blankets 

Esther Hellman Club (San Bruno Neighborhood House) 

Flannel Bed Jackets 

S. F. Fruit and Flower Mission. . . .Thanksgiving Dinners for Six Families 

Concordia and Argonaut Clubs Papers and Magazines 

Margorie and Georgiana Lewis, Hand-made Bead Chains for Small Children 
Mrs. Meyer Chaban (Sewing Circle) Chanuka Candy 

— 48 — 



Miss Edith Hecht Money for Toys 

Dr. Maurice Heppner 3 5.00 

Dr. Holzberg 5.00 

Mr. A. S. Sugarman 2.00 

Mrs. Albert Ehrman 5.00 

Mrs. Herman Loewenstein 10.00 

Memory Fund (Mrs. Max Wolf, Mrs. M. C. Sloss, Mrs. L. G. Gold- 
man, Mrs. A. L. Gump) 10.50 

Mrs. Florence Schloss 100.00 

Last but by no means least is that splendid corps of volunteer 
social workers who have been so regular in their clinic work. 

Mrs. Leon Voorsanger Miss Martha Blumenthal 

Mrs. J. M. Jacobi Miss Helen Weinstein 

Mrs. Claire deGrucchy Miss Elizabeth Jacobi 

Mrs. Lawrence Bachman Miss Arline Rosenblatt 

Mrs. Louis Goldman Miss Carolyn Haevenrich 

Mrs. Albert Ehrman Miss Helen Katten 

Mrs. Herman Loewenstein Miss Flora Rosenfeld 

Mrs. C. H. Frutiger Miss Nita Nieto 

Miss Helen Son Miss Katherine Corrigan 

Miss Blanche Son Miss Rosenstock 

Miss Hinda Baer Mrs. Hirschfeld 
Miss Helen Levy 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPHINE ABRAHAM, 
Director of Dispensary and Social Service. 



49 — 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



STATISTICS OF PATIENTS— ADMISSIONS AND 

DISCHARGES— 1921 

PRIVATE ROOMS AND WARDS 



Number of Patients Admitted. . . 
Number of Patients Treated. . . . 
Number of Patients Discharged . 
Number of Days Treatment. . . . 



Rooms 



2,119 

2,595 

2,124 

14,070 



Wards 



1,208 

1,599 

1,208 

11,388^ 



Total 



3,327 
4,194 

3,332 
25,458}^ 



Number of Births 497 Number of Deaths 76 

FREE WARDS 

Number of Patients Admitted 1,408 

Number of Patients Treated 1,991 

Number of Patients Discharged 1,393 

Number of Days Treatment 18,087 

Number of Births 115 

Number of Deaths 33 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF CASES AND 
DAYS' TREATMENT 



FREE AND SEMI-PRIVATE SERVICE 






Number of Cases 


Total 


Number of Days 
Treatment 


Total 


SURGICAL 


Free 344 

Semi-Private 426 


770 


3,348 
3,870 


7,218 


MEDICAL 


Free 264 

Semi-Private 208 


472 


3,492 
2,221 


5,713 


OBSTETRICAL 


Free 36 

Semi-Private 136 


172 


319 
1,081 


1,400 


CHILDREN'S 
MEDICAL 


Free 245 

Semi-Private 3 5 


280 


2,196 

323 


2,519 


CHILDREN'S 
SURGICAL 


Free 134 

Semi-Private 163 


297 


606 
631 


1,237 


Totals 




1,991 




18,087 



50 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



STATISTICS DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT— 1921 

Number Number 

of Cases of Cases 

Surgical 3,667 Genito-Urinary 1,564 

Gynecological 1,555 Orthopaedic 821 

Medical 4,546 Massage 861 

Pediatric 3,346 Dental 2,065 

Dermatological 1,418 Neurological 198 

Ear, Nose, Throat 22,541 Mental Hygiene 91 

Eye 1,047 Refraction 626 

Obstetrical 782 

Number of New Cases 2,550 

Number of Old Cases 22,291 



Total 24,841 

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS 

Department: Department: 

Pediatrics 180 Dermatological 24 

Ear, Nose, Throat 324 Surgical-Gynecology 406 

Medical 276 Genito-Urinary 53 

Obstetrical 130 

GENERAL STATISTICS 

Number of — Number of — 

Nurse's Visits 6,330 Doctor's Visits 346 

Free Optical Orders 132 Free Wassermann Orders. 114 

X-Ray Orders 219 Orthopaedic Orders 52 

Ambulance Orders 38 Nurses' Visits 76 

Free Prescriptions 1,539 Pay Prescriptions 4,184 



51 — 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



Organized October 2, 1850 
Incorporated March 29, 1851 Re -Incorporated April 9, 1907 

Business Office: 436 O'Farrell Street 
Telephone Franklin 546 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS— 1922 

OFFICERS 
President Treasurer 

JOHN I. WALTER HERBERT R CLAYBURGH 

Vice-President Secretary 

MORRIS MITAU MEYER H. LEVY 

Vice-President Superintendent 

SIMON ANSPACHER I. IRVING LIPSITCH 

DIRECTORS 

Term expires Term expires 

April 1st April 1st 

John C. Altman 1924 Morris Mitau 1925 

Simon Anspacher 1925 Henry Redlick 1924 

Herbert E. Clayburgh 1924 Mrs. Amanda Schlesinger. . 1923 

Louis Friedlander 1925 Morris Spiegelman 1923 

Walter S. Heller 1925 John I. Walter 1924 

Henry L. Mayer 1923 



STANDING COMMITTEES— 1922 

CHILDREN'S WELFARE 

SIMON ANSPACHER, Chairman Mrs. Amanda Schlesinger 

WELFARE OF THE AGED 

MORRIS MITAU, Chairman Louis Friedlander 

DESERTION AND LEGAL AID 

JOHN C. ALTMAN, Chairman Richard S. Goldman 

ADMINISTRATION 

MORRIS MITAU 

AUDIT AND FINANCE 

HERBERT E. CLAYBURGH, Chairman 
Henry L. Mayer Samuel Meyer 

WIDOW AND ORPHAN FUND 

HENRY SINSHEIMER, Chairman 
Simon Anspacher Albert Meyer 

CARE OF THE SICK 

WALTER S. HELLER, Chairman 
Herbert E. Clayburgh Henry Redlick 

— 52 — 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The laws of our Society require me to submit for your 
consideration a statement of the work which fell to us, and of 
the results attained. In doing so, I hope that I shall be able to 
show that we have, in serving those whom circumstances 
brought to our attention, done so faithfully, conscientiously 
intelligently, and with a view to not alone their own best 
interests, but also to the advantage of the community in gen- 
eral, and the Jewish community in particular. 

It is first important to measure the extent of the problem as 
it was presented to us during the year 1921. An analysis of 
the Statistical Tables which are included herein, shows that 
2,207 individuals were served by us during the year; it is quite 
remarkable that this number is almost the exact number whom 
we served in 1920, when the figure was 2,214. However, there 
is a pronounced difference between the two years. We dealt 
with 866 cases in 1921 as against 731 in 1920. The discrepancy 
in the number of cases is due to the fact that we had a very 
much larger number of unattached persons to deal with in 
1921, namely 438 against 316. This was largely because of 
the industrial depression and the consequent unrest which 
prevailed throughout the country, as a result of which many 
men, and women, too, were unable to find employment in 
their own communities, sought better chances elsewhere; with 
limited resources many of them started out for the West, from 
which glowing reports of stabilized conditions had reached 
them ; they came in large numbers to San Francisco, where, too, 
they experienced difficulties; their resources wiped out, they 
finally came to our attention. Most of them asked for work, 
and they were really anxious to maintain themselves by honest 
toil, but this has been most difficult to find for them. The few 
vacancies which could from time to time be unearthed, were 
needed for those who had a greater claim on the community by 
reason of a longer residence or because they had immediate 
dependents. The employers, too, having a choice, did not 
willingly accept those who were newcomers in our midst, and 
who would probably not remain here long enough to become 
part and parcel of our community life. The situation of these 
"transients" or "non-residents" was rather critical, and while 
the amount of money needed to relieve their distress was not 
alarmingly large, they did require a great deal of service and 
considerable financial assistance. Most "family welfare" 
agencies like ours, in this city and elsewhere, do not concern 
themselves with unattached men and women, occupying them- 
selves altogether with aiding families. Our policy in the past 
has been to include these unattached persons in the scope of 
our activities. To determine whether the increased work and 

— 53 — 



responsibilities made it necessary for us to confine ourselves 
to resident families and individuals, the matter was carefully 
considered by the Board of Directors, which reached the con- 
clusion that in order to safeguard the community from the 
individual solicitation that would follow closely on any change 
of our policy, it would be necessary for us to continue our inter- 
est in the cases of any Jewish men, women or children who 
came to our notice directly or indirectly, whether they be 
strangers in our midst or residents. 

We further formulated a policy of returning to the com- 
munities from which they came those who become dependent 
within the first year of their residence here. This policy we 
are prepared to adhere to rather rigidly, because we feel 
that any other method of treatment would impose an undue 
burden on those who support our and other local institutions, 
and would, at the same time, attract to San Francisco a group 
of persons who cannot hope to become self-supporting. Of 
course, we have made and will make exceptions to this rule, 
especially in the cases of those who need but a temporary hand 
of friendship; these in some measure, include persons from 
foreign countries — who have lost their all in the wake of the 
War. We are now dealing with a group of such families, whose 
standard of living is high and must be maintained. We feel 
sure that they will eventually become a credit to our city and 
to our community. 

Our relationship to the State, the County and the City, 
from all of which a large number of our clients receive aid which 
is administered by us, has been increasing pleasantly and effec- 
tively. 

Together with representatives of the Juvenile Court, the 
Associated Charities and the Catholic Charities, our agents 
serve on a Case Committee which passes on all applications 
for City and County Aid before the same are presented to the 
Judge of the Court who must, under the law, decide whether aid 
is required. This co-operative spirit has contributed largely 
to the promotion of standardized thought by and among the 
three large relief organizations which operate in this City. 

1 "Sickness" appears to be the reason for the distress in 
about one-fifth of the cases with which we deal. Realizing 
that a reduction in the number of those who are ill will mean a 
substantial reduction in our relief disbursements, we have 
continued and enlarged our preventive work. Mount Zion 
Hospital, its clinics, visiting physicians and nurses, have 
co-operated heartily with us. All children under our care 
are being carefully examined as to physical, dental and mental 
condition regularly every six months, and all remediable de- 
fects are being closely scrutinized with very promising results. 
However, we have been working on broader lines of preventive 
medicine, and we hope soon to see the establishment at Mount 
Zion of an Adult Health Centre, which shall serve as a diag- 

— 54 — 



nostic centre for the benefit of those with whom we and other 
social agencies come into contact — persons who are not sick, 
but rather who believe themselves perfectly well. An experi- 
ment has already been made in this matter, the results of which 
force the conclusion that a well-organized and properly con- 
ducted Health Centre will bring to light the existence of 
many defects which with early attention can be corrected; we 
think that this will mean an economic saving to the community 
and also to our Society. 

Our Committee on the Care of the Sick under the Chair- 
manship of Mr. Walter Heller, who is also a member of the 
Hospital Board, has organized and formulated rules for the 
guidance of our office in dealing with those who apply to us for 
aid during or because of sickness. This Committee will be 
extremely helpful in developing a constructive program of 
prevention of disease and rehabilitation of the sick. 

Our other Committees — Children's Welfare Committee 
with Mr. Simon Anspacher as its Chairman, the Committee 
on the Welfare of the Aged with Mr. Morris Mitau as its Chair- 
man and the Committee on Desertion and Legal Aid under the 
Chairmanship of John C. Altman — have been meeting regularly ; 
they have carefully scrutinized the work entrusted to their 
care and have given it every attention. 

Our child-placing work has progressed very satisfactorily, so 
that our boarding homes which have been visited by public 
officials and visitors from other agencies, both local and foreign, 
have brought forth encouragement and admiration. 

We have expended, in relief alone, $108,847, exclusive of 
the cost of service given, and the administrative disbursements, 
the details of which will appear in our Secretary's Financial 
Statement. Of this amount, $52,328 or nearly 50 per cent 
came from City, County and State; an additional $11,000 in 
round figures came from and directly in behalf of those whom 
we served. The remainder and all the other expenditures of 
our Society came from the Jewish men and women of San 
Francisco through our parent body, the Federation. It was 
indeed fortunate for our Society and those to whose welfare it 
is dedicated, that the response to the Federation's appeal was 
generous. We hope and believe that it will be possible for our 
community to look after our needs in the future as it has in the 
past. 

4 'Service" rather than "almsgiving" is our watch w T ord. In 
line with this modern conception of our responsibilities, our 
good offices were extended in the direction of enabling residents 
of this City to send help to their relatives in Russia by the 
purchase of food drafts of the American Relief Administration 
and the Joint Distribution Committee; since December 2, 
1921, drafts to the value of $3,500, were purchased by 243 
persons without any charge either to them or to their relatives 
other than the actual cost of the draft. 

— 55 — 



We have also assisted in organizing the work of securing 
the financial adoption here of European War Orphans. Since 
last March 235 adoptions, each carrying with it a contribution 
of $100 for a child's maintenance for one year, have been 
procured locally; and as a result of the impetus gained here, 
additional 349 adoptions were procured in California, Oregon 
and Washington, making the total contributions from the 
Pacific Coast $58,400. In this work, Mr. Max Schwabacher, 
whose distinguished father was at one time the President of the 
Hebrew Board of Relief, which then included our organization, 
has given all his time, talents and energy, freely and unreserv- 
edly, as he has done for two years past as a volunteer member 
of our Staff. 

My predecessor, Mr. Morgan A. Gunst, called attention a 
year ago to our aid in the establishment of a municipal office 
whose function it shall be to check the evils of child and wife 
desertion. We found during the year that in order to vigor- 
ously search out and deal with those who had in years past 
left their homes without making provisions for their depen- 
dents, it required the service of a trained expert. Accordingly 
we enlisted the co-operation of the other two agencies in the 
city who had the same problem, and for the past five months, a 
Jewish worker is being jointly employed by the Associated 
Charities, the Affiliated Catholic Charities and the Eureka 
Benevolent Society, to follow up the deserters, to bring them 
back to a realization of their responsibilities, and, if necessary, 
to prosecute them. A number of cases have been successfully 
solved; others are pending, but we are convinced of the wisdom 
of the step we took, not only by the social results, but also by 
the financial savings which have accrued to us in these cases. 
Our Mr. John C. Altman and the members of his Committee 
have aided materially in this very extraordinarily difficult 
piece of work. 

The extension of our activities has been very decided, and 
we have become considerably hampered by lack of space. 
This matter is constantly in our minds because of the handicap 
it presents to our indefatigable Vice-President, Mr. Morris 
Mitau, whose work and modesty are too well known to require 
comment and also, of course, to our Superintendent, Mr. I. 
Irving Lipsitch. Accordingly this matter was carefully looked 
into by a Special Committee which has recommended against 
the expenditure of any money on the further remodelling of our 
building, especially as the matter of securing other quarters 
for the business office of the Federation is now under considera- 
tion. If the Executive Committee feels warranted in seeking 
space elsewhere, we shall probably find that the facilities of 
our building will answer our needs at least for some years to 
come. 

Realizing the limitations of time, I deem it wise to condense 
this report. I wish to record before concluding the valuable 

— 56 — 



assistance rendered your President by the members of our 
Board, by our various Committees, by our employees, by the 
various departments of Federation, and last, but by no means 
least, by Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch, whose service to the Society, 
to the Federation and to the community, grow more valuable 
every year that he devotes them to our work. 

May I, in conclusion, ask you to pause for a moment, in 
memory of Henry G. Meyer, who served us as Treasurer 
faithfully and well. His example of service, his inspiration as 
a student of social problems, his devotion to the cause of 
humanity, should be an incentive to all of us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN I. WALTER, 

President. 



57 — 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



VICE-PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The futility of addressing an assembly like the one before 
me lies in the fact that there is little that I can bring forth which 
is new, as we are the ones who in one way or another endeavor 
to do for the community what we can; it lies in the fact that we 
are co-workers that we fairly well know what our work is, that 
we are convinced of each other's will to "Do," do it with a 
"Will" and to the best of our ability. There is, however, one 
point which I will endeavor to bring out in which you can be 
of material assistance, by strengthening our hand in the work 
of the Eureka Benevolent Society. 

The deplorable fact is that the vast majority of the sub- 
scribers to the Federation are disinterested in its real work or 
that of its constituent societies; they are interested in but 
two items: FIRST, the amount of the yearly subscriptions, 
which, in their opinion, relieves them from all further responsi- 
bility ; SECONDLY, the criticism of the manner in which the 
work is done; as to this, they are, of course, as contributors, 
fully entitled to comment and criticize, but only on the basis 
of information and knowledge. 

Now it is a fact that we most sincerely invite constructive 
criticism; we desire to be intelligently advised; we know that 
discussions of our problems are helpful and lead to better work. 
We would appreciate the coming into our office of people who 
have something to tell us or who have come to ask for explana- 
tions. By this attitude we would be either convinced of a better 
way, or the visitor would be convinced that our way of doing 
is correct. In either case the result is not only a satisfaction, 
but a real help. 

Unfortunately this course is rarely adopted; matters are 
discussed at the club, at luncheons, or at bridge afternoons, by 
persons who never did social work, but who by simply talking, 
and by talking to people who know just as little as they them- 
selves do of social service, do positive harm through destructive 
criticism. Being fairly acquainted with the work of the 
Eureka Benevolent Society, I may speak of this feature with 
some confidence. 

It is astonishing that the work of the Eureka Benevolent 
Society, an organization which has existed in this city for over 
sixty years is so little understood as it is, even by subscribers 
of many years' standing. There is a very general impression 
that the function of the Eureka Benevolent Society is primarily 
to deal with professional seekers of alms. Now it is a fact that 
the "Professional," as such, is practically eliminated from our 
work, and gives us no serious concern, through methods which 
have been proven, and I may also say are "thorough." This 
should become fairly evident when I say that during the past 

— 58 — 



year we dealt with 866 cases involving 2,207 individuals; 
they came to our notice for varied reasons, such as tuberculosis, 
other sickness, physical defects, mental defects, unemploy- 
ment, imprisonment of wage earner, insufficient earnings, old 
age, desertion, widowhood, dependency of children, domestic 
difficulties and an assortment of miscellaneous and unclassified 
causes. There is practically no phase of life with which we do 
not come in contact and with which we do not have to deal at 
one time or another. 

One of the causes of difficulty in our work is the S. O. S. 
call over the telephone of some well intentioned subscriber, in 
behalf of a person or family who was just brought to his notice, 
giving a heart-rending description of the situation. In almost 
every instance the reported case is one that we have known 
for some time, often for many years. If the subscriber would, 
before giving privately in such cases, notify our office, or better 
still, would take the trouble to call on us, before taking the 
applicant's statement at face value, imposition would often 
be checked. 

We know that in many instances without a knowledge of 
the situation, we have been called "heartless" and that without 
investigation our office has been charged with having refused 
all assistance; that charitably and kindly disposed individuals 
have frequently made ill advised gifts to persons who should 
have been placed on their own responsibility for good and suffi- 
cient reasons, that we have been roundly condemned, and the 
statement that we have without reason denied help has been 
circulated among friends and acquaintances, with the result 
that we have often received undue and undeserved criticism 
which has been as destructive as it has been unfair. 

This destructive criticism undermines our work, it does 
worse than that, it often takes the heart out of it for the time 
being; not permanently to be sure, for if it did we would not be 
fit to carry on; but it is indeed very discouraging. 

To be criticized by an applicant, aye even to be insulted is 
not rare. We are broad enough to take it as an incident of the 
work, due to ignorance and sometimes to worse attributes, 
but we have only a right to expect that the Federation con- 
tributors should exercise judgment; they should know that this 
organization is managed by people who also have human in- 
stincts, and who thoroughly go into the merits of each and 
every case, acting on the knowledge gained and on the basis of 
experience. 

Our denying aid is never, as you can readily see, a personal 
matter with us, any more than the refusal of a physician to 
prescribe a certain course of treatment which is demanded by 
the patient, is due to the personal feeling of the doctor. Our 
denial is always based on a belief that the individual's good and 
the community's good both require certain action on our part — 

— 59 — 



often requiring considerable physical as well as moral courage. 
To illustrate : 

We had a telephone call from Presidio Terrace — a woman 
was asking some resident there for help ; she was told to go to 
the Eureka Benevolent Society; she replied that it was useless 
to go there, because she had already been there for help which 
was denied her. We asked for the name of the applicant and 
discovered that that person had been known to us for years 
and had been assisted by us for years. We looked up our 
records and found that shortly before that day, this woman 
had been given $96 worth of household furnishings, consisting 
of sheets, pillow cases, towels, blankets, shoes and grocery 
orders. 

This is not an isolated case, but a typical case. I am trying 
to impress upon you the necessity of bringing your acquain- 
tances to the realization of the fact that statements should be 
verified ; that they can frequently be best verified after consul- 
tation with us. Your friends must be convinced that we are 
earnestly trying to do the right thing by all of our applicants, 
that we are endeavoring to be just, that we have dependable 
records, that we know "Who is Who" ; they should consider us 
as they would their own doctor in case of sickness, whom they 
would call in and whose directions they would follow, instead of 
trying to play the doctor's role by undertaking a cure when they 
are not competent to judge the causes or symptoms. 

Whenever the time comes that our subscribers have this 
confidence in us, a confidence to which by reason of judgment 
and experience and human instincts we are entitled, it will 
indeed be a wonderful help to everyone who devotes himself 
or herself to social work. If you see the justice of these re- 
marks, and will have your friends look at this matter from 
this standpoint and urge them to act accordingly, you will do 
a service of the greatest value, and help the excellent work of 
our able Superintendent, Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch, under whose 
guidance we are trying to do what is expected of us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. MITAU, Vice-President. 



— 60 — 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

GENERAL FUND 

INCOME 
Schedule A: 

Contributions Towards Children's Aid: 

From City and County of San Francisco 

account committed children #40,136.89 

From Widows' Pension Bureau account 
maintenance of widows and their minor 
children 12,191.01 



352,327.90 
From relatives and friends 3,160.99 



3 55,488.89 
Bequests : 

George S. Newbauer 500.00 

Donations : 

From Mrs. Sigmund Schwabacher, in memory 

of husband 2100.00 

From Sig. M. Heller, in memory of father 100.00 

Charles Rosenthal 10.00 

J. Rosenberg 5.00 

William Nossen 6.00 

221.00 

Relief Grants Returned 2,383.17 

Contributions Towards Transportation 1,990.57 

Contributions Towards Special Cases 2,795.13 

Interest on Treasurer's Balances and Investments 1,092.73 

Returned Expenses: 

Account telephone service 3180.00 

Account auto insurance 25.45 

Account clothing bureau 438.64 

644.09 

Federation of Jewish Charities : 

a/c allotment for 1921 74,568.19 

Total 3139,683.77 

EXPENDITURES 
Relief: 

Pensions 369,028.78 

.General Relief 17,507.78 

Transportation 2,861.13 

Rents 1,077.01 

Rehabilitation 197.15 

Furniture 363.12 

Medical' Aid 846.72 

Interments 105.00 

Clothing Bureau 9,414.32 

Nursing and Caretaking 3,890.79 

Milk 3,555.47 



3108,847.27 



61 — 



Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 322,766.31 

Car Fares 257.63 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 1,907.44 

Telegrams 322.80 

Telephones 754.42 

Sundries 2,423.82 

House Expenses 2,460.66 

Automobile Expenses 549.30 

3 31,442.38 

Auto Equipment 323.30 

Office Equipment 385.80 

Taxes 185.02 



Total 3141,183.77 



Expenditures 3141,183.77 

Income 3139,683.77 

Less Bequests transferred to 

Endowment Fund 500.00 

139,183.77 



Deficit 3 2,000.00 



ASSETS 

Cash: Commercial Account 3 3,519.35 

Savings Bank Deposits . 3,338.74 

Realty Holdings: 

Silver Property 3 300.00 

Liebig St. Property 1,874.56 

Eichenbaum Property 164. 15 

Kushner Propeity 3 17.40 

2,656.11 

Office and Investigators' Cash Advanced 395.00 

Loan Account 2,011.54 

Trust Funds 147.47 

Accounts Receivable- 
Federation of Jewish Charities 34,748.19 



Fresh Air Fund 49.50 



Bonds: 

Par Value Book Value 

5,000 Pacific Light and Power Co. 5% 35,000.00 

5,050 U. S. of A. 3rd Liberty Loan 4^%. . . . 5,050.00 
7,650 U. S. of A. 4th Liberty Loan 4Ji%. . . . 7,640.00 
2,500 Congregation Sherith Israel 5% 2,500.00 



4,797.69 



20,190.00 



Total 3 37,055.90 

LIABILITIES 
Special Funds: 

San Bruno Fund 3300.00 

Real Estate Loan Fund 232.95 

3532.95 

— 62 — 



Accounts Payable: 

Widow and Orphan Fund 24,250.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 2,460.66 

2 6,710.66 

Capital Account 29,812.29 

Total 337,055.90 



WIDOW AND ORPHAN FUND 

INCOME 
Schedule B: 

Interest on Investments #7,675.00 

EXPENDITURES 

Dispensations to Widows and Orphans 24,860.00 

Sundry Expenses 42.50 

Total 24,902.50 

Income 27,675.00 

Expenditures 4,902.50 

Surplus 22,772.50 

ASSETS 
Bonds : 

Par Value Book Value 

13,000 Northern Railway of California 213,000.00 

20,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. . 15,400.00 

10,000 New York Central Railway 6,600.00 

5,000 Union Pacific Railway 4,100.00 

10,000 Baltimore and Ohio Railway 6,700.00 

10,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Ry. . . 7,400.00 

5,000 Bay Counties Power 4,750.00 

5,000 Southern Pacific R. R. Refunding. . . 3,900.00 

4,000 Los Angeles Gas and Electric Co 3,600.00 

14,000 Spring Valley Water Company 11,760.00 

10,000 San Francisco City Hall 10,000.00 

5,000 Pacific Electric R. R 4,000.00 

5,000 Northern California Railway 5,000.00 

5,000 Northern Pacific Railway 4,000.00 

5,000 Reading Co. & Philadelphia Reading 

Coal and Iron Co 4,100.00 

5,000 U. S. of A. 2nd Liberty Loan Bonds. 4,762.50 

5,000 East Bay Water Co 4,675.00 

10,000 U. S. of A. 4th Liberty Loan Bonds.. 9,475.00 

5,000 Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. . . 4,725.00 

3,000 Rolph Navigation & Coal Co 2,700.00 

6,000 Palace Hotel Company 6,000.00 

5,000 N. Y. Central R.R. Equipment Certif. 5,000.00 

1,000 French Republic 1,000.00 

3,000 Market St. Railway Co. Notes 2,100.00 

169,000 2144,747.50 

— 63 — 



Cash: 

Commercial Account $1,745.18 

With Secretary 400.00 

Advanced General Fund 4,250.00 

Total ?151,142.68 

LIABILITIES 
Capital Account: 

January 1, 1921 2148,370.18 

Surplus, 1921 2,772.50 

Total 2151,142.68 



— 64 — 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



STATISTICAL LIST OF CASES, 1921 

New Cases : 

Resident Families 68 

Resident Single Persons 52 

120 

Transient Families 48 

Transient Single Persons 231 

279 

Recurrent Cases: 

Resident Families 307 

Resident Single Persons 141 

448 

Transient Families 5 

Transient Single Persons 14 

19 

Families : 

New Resident 68 

New Transient 48 

116 

Recurrent Resident 307 

Recurrent Transient 5 

312 

Individuals in families 1,769 

Single Persons: 

New Resident 52 

New Transient 231 

283 

Recurrent Resident 141 

Recurrent Transient 14 

155 

Individuals 438 

2,207 



399 



467 

866 



428 



438 
866 





Families 


Single 
Persons 


Total 


Families 


Single 
Persons 


Total 


Grand 
Total 


Resident 


68 

New 


52 

New 


120 


307 
Rec. 


141 
Rec. 


447 
Rec. 


568 


Transient 


48 

New 


231 

New 


279 


5 
Rec. 


14 
Rec. 


19 
Rec. 


298 


Total 


116 


283 


399 


312 


155 


467 


866 



271 Out-of-Town Investigations. 



65 — 



Social Status: 

Married 272 

Widow 108 

I Xserted 66 

Widower 45 

Divorced 29 

Unattached Men 9] 

Married and Childless 39 [ 326 

Single 298 J 

866 

LENGTH OF RESIDENCE 

In the 
United States 

Under 1 year 20 

From 1 to 2 years 16 

From 2 to 3 years ( 6 

From 3 to 5 years 15 

From 5 to 10 years 123 

Over 10 years 662 

Unknown 24 




866 866 



Causes: 



Out of Employment 262 

Old Age 57 

Insufficient Earnings 50 

Sickness 177 

Physical Defect 14 

Mental Defect 14 

Children 57 

No Male Support 154 

Shiftless 18 

Imprisonment 7 

Domestic Difficulties 14 



Applied for: 

Legal Aid 8 

Transportation 34 



824 



42 
866 



Nativity: 



Australia 2 

Austria 63 

Bohemia 4 

Canada 4 

Egypt 3 

England 23 

France 9 

Germany 62 

Hawaiian Islands 2 

Hungary 30 

Italy 1 

Jamaica 4 

Jerusalem 3 

— 66 — 



Nova Scotia 1 

Persia 2 

Poland 44 

Palestine 5 

Roumania 40 

Russia 343 

Scotland 3 

Switzerland 2 

Turkey 4 

Tunis 1 

United States 197 

Unknown 14 

866 



67 



HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 

2504 HOWARD STREET 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1922 

President Honorary Secretary 

EMILE E. KAHN AMELIA LEVY 

First Vice-President Treasurer 

LOUIS S. HAAS ISAAC MOSS 

Second Vice-President Secretary 

ALBERT M. BENDER MEYER H. LEVY 

DIRECTORS 

Samuel Abrahm Maurice Liebmann 

A. Aronson Maurice L. Rapheld 

I. M. Friedberg Mrs. B. Schapiro 

Joseph Hyman Louis A. Schwabacher 

Ira Kahn Miss Hattie Sheideman 



COMMITTEES 

HOUSE—HOWARD STREET HOME 

SAMUEL ABRAHM, Chairman 
Miss Amelia Levy Mrs. B. Schapiro 

HOUSE— SILVER AVENUE HOME 

LOUIS S. HAAS, Chairman 
Maurice Liebmann Miss Hattie Sheideman 

FINANCE 

JOSEPH HYMAN, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Isaac Moss 

Ira Kahn Louis A. Schwabacher 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

A. ARONSON, Chairman 
Louis S. Haas Gustave Schnee 

PURCHASING 

LOUIS A. SCHWABACHER, Chairman 
Isaac Moss Mrs. B. Schapiro 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS 

ISAAC MOSS, Chairman 
Miss Amelia Levy Mrs. B. Schapiro 

— 68 — 



FURNISHINGS OF NEW HOME 

MISS HATTIE SHEIDEMAN, Chairman 
Mrs. Abraham Haas Mrs. M. S. Koshland 

Gustav Lachman 



HEBREW HOME FOR AGED AND DISABLED— 2504 Howard 
Superintendent and Matron 

MR. AND MRS. H. WALCER 



PACIFIC HEBREW HOME— 80 Silver Avenue 
Superintendent and Matron 

MR. AND MRS. GUSTAVE SCHNEE 



— 69 — 



HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

We are assembled together today in Annual Meeting, for 
the purpose of organizing for the incoming year and to review 
the work that has been done the year just closed. 

The financial condition of the Home will be depicted to 
you fully in the report of the Secretary, which will be pre- 
sented at this meeting. 

We have been working for many years under our original 
Constitution and By-Laws. While the same were valuable 
when our Home was younger and of less moment and im- 
portance than it is at the present time, it has become nec- 
essary, especially taking into consideration our close relation- 
ship with the other affiliated charities forming part of the 
Federation of Jewish Charities, to give this matter considera- 
tion, and at this meeting a draft will be presented to you for 
your consideration. 

Modern ideas have been adopted in same and the work of 
the Home and the efficiency to be secured, will be materially 
improved by the adoption of same. 

At the beginning of the year 1921, we had sixty-two (62) 
inmates in the two institutions that we control; thirty-four 
(34) in the Silver Avenue Home and twenty-eight (28) in the 
Howard Street Home. We have admitted six (6) in the Silver 
Avenue Home and nine (9) in the Howard Street Home, viz. : 

IN THE SILVER AVENUE HOME 

Admitted Admitted 

Aaron Segel January 28 Harry Rose May 12 

Ferdinand Wunderlich. . . .April 14 Fanny Gundelfinger August 4 

Louis Goldberg April 17 Simon Ceitlin September 17 

The nine admitted to the 

HOWARD STREET HOME 

are the following: 

Admitted Admitted 

Paul Schwalbe February 14 Annie Meyer May 26 

Rose Myers February 17 Annie Reisberg May 30 

Benjamin Gold February 21 Louis Goldstein July 27 

Rose Lauter March 21 Lena Alexander August 10 

Abraham Peters May 11 

We have lost, by death, six (6) from the Silver Avenue 
Home and five (5) from the Howard Street Home, viz.: 

SILVER AVENUE HOME 

Died Died 

Moses Lustman March 12 Julius Popert August 1 

Jacob Cohn. . . April 24 Phillipina Cohen October 9 

Leopold Eckstein June 2 Harry Ross October 26 

— 70 — 



HOWARD STREET HOME 

Isaac Solomon May 2 Paul Schwalbe August 9 

Yetta Yarcowitz May 12 Henrietta Hamburger. . .October 19 

Jennie Schwartz June 1 1 

Two (2) inmates from the Silver Avenue Home and one (1) 
from the Howard Street Home, left of their own volition, viz. : 

SILVER AVENUE HOME 

Aaron Segel Helen Looryea 

HOWARD STREET HOME 

Sarah Cohen 

Leaving a total number of inmates on December 31, 1921, of 
sixty-three (63). 

Your directors devoted a great deal of time and attention 
to the matter of the new building. 

At the last Annual Meeting it was the hope of your Board 
of Directors that this meeting today could be held in our new 
home, but the writer is reminded of the old Chinese maxim: 

"The boy may plan to fly his kite 
The man to cut his hay, 
But the old north wind comes up at night 
And blows their plans away." 

The "north wind" referred to in this maxim was personi- 
fied in the matter of the new building, by the long extended 
strike of the unions connected with the building trades, 
necessitating suspension of work on the new building for a 
number of months; and due principally to that event, we 
hardly believe that the Home will be completed until some 
time in the middle of this year. 

It is with great disappointment that I have to report this 
fact but as you will readily appreciate the cause, it was 
beyond the control of your Board of Directors. 

In addition to the strike, certain changes were made by 
the Board in the plans and specifications, as bids had been 
taken on the grading, concrete, plumbing, heating, electric and 
masonry work and your Building Committee found that 
savings could be made by certain changes that would not, in 
any way, be a detriment to the building; and after these 
changes had been fully and properly considered, the Build- 
ing Committee, in consultation with the architect, prepared 
the revised plans and drawings, on which additional figures 
were taken, which caused further reductions in the bids 
obtained. 

Your Building Committee, at the recommendation of the 
architect, decided not to let any further contracts on the Home, 
until such time as this work was absolutely necessary; very 

— 71 — 



fortunately for us the market has declined and all labor 
troubles have been adjusted, which means that when figures 
will be taken for the rest of the work, for which our architect 
has now received instructions to proceed with, it is contem- 
plated and expected that a saving will be made on the estimate 
given to us on our completed project. 

I am happy to state, however, that all work is again in 
progress; that the excavation and concrete work has been 
completed, that the plumbing, electric and heating contracts 
are nearing completion and that the exterior brick work is 
now being installed. 

The contracts that are still to be awarded are carpenter- 
ing, roofing, sheet metal, laths and plastering, hardware, 
marble, ornamental, iron, glass and painting. 

I should, at this time, also like to bring forth to the Board 
of Directors the question of certain planting and landscape 
gardening so that when the building is complete the grounds 
will be somewhat presentable and that the completed project 
will not look barren and cold. If this gardening and land- 
scape work could be done at the present time, not doing such 
work around the building that would interfere with other 
work or being destroyed by workmen, the impression to the 
public, of this building that is being erected for Aged and 
Disabled, would be far more impressive. 

The question as to the approaches, driveways, etc., should 
also be carefully considered at this time. 

It is with a great deal of gratification and pleasure that I 
call attention to the report of our physician, Dr. E. M. Weiss, 
who, for many years, has been indefatigable in the services 
demanded of him; both by day or night, sunshine or rain, he 
has answered all summons made of him and deserves the 
highest appreciation and consideration from this organization. 

The year just passed has been the first year of the Secre- 
taryship of Mr. Meyer H. Levy of this organization and it is 
with a feeling of pride that I profit of this occasion to compli- 
ment the Board of Directors on the change. 

While the work of preceding years was very well done, it 
entailed much labor on the part of the directors, while under 
the present arrangement the work is assumed by the office of 
Mr. Levy and the accounting is in harmony with the general 
accounting adopted on the part of the Federation of Jewish 
Charities. 

It is very gratifying on the part of your directors to note 
that our efforts and labors in reference to the new building, 
are appreciated on the part of the Executive Committee of 
the Federation; the President of that organization in his last 
report stating that this institution (referring to the new build- 
ing we are now erecting) when completed, will be a monument 
to the generosity of the donor (the late Julius Friedman) and 

— 72 — 



will prove a fit companion to the various Jewish Institutions 
now completed or under course of construction. 

It is with sorrow that I am compelled to report that one of 
our directors, Mr. Henry G. Meyer, has been confined to his 
home by illness since December 25, 1921. 

Mr. Meyer, as chairman of our Building Committee, has 
done noble work and we pray God that he will soon be restored 
to full health and be able to continue the work he has so ably 
begun. 

I cannot close my report without making special mention 
of the assistance your Board of Directors has received from 
its secretary, Mr. Meyer H. Levy, its two superintendents 
and matrons, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Schnee, of the Silver 
Avenue Home, and Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Gladstone, of the 
Howard Street Home. And as mentioned above in this 
report, the manner in which Dr. E. M. Weiss has fulfilled the 
arduous duties demanded of him for the physical welfare of 
our inmates. 

I desire to express my great appreciation to my fellow 
directors for their conscientious labors and never failing 
courtesies to me and the great interest they have taken in the 
fulfillment of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(ss) EMILE E. KAHN, 

President. 



— 73 — 



HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

GENERAL FUND: 

INCOME 

Bequests: 

Benjamin Lezer Liveson $ 122.40 

Donations: 

Abraham Ruby 3200.00 

Mrs. Eva Samson 200.00 

J. Barth & Co 207.79 

Albert M. Bender 180.00 

Mrs. Louis A. Schwabacher, commemorating con- 
firmation of daughter 50.00 

In memory of Abraham Haas, per Gustave 

Schnee 30.00 

Albert and May Schwabacher 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Triest, Los Angeles, in mem- 
ory of Abraham Haas 25.00 

M. M. Morris, in commemoration of marriage of 

daughter 25.00 

Contribution Box at Howard Street Home 17.20 

Henry Rosenthal 37.50 

Celia Rheinstein 20.00 

Mrs. Hattie Wertheimer 10.00 

Miriam Louise Bernstein 10.00 

Contributions at Memorial Services 6.00 

Mrs. Pauline Myers 10.00 

Mrs. Sam Aftergut, towards care of perpetual 

light 10.00 

1,063.49 

Donations to New Home Furnishings: 

From Joseph Hyman 1,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities: 

Payment covering deficit for 1920 $ 489.53 

Allotment for 1921 28,200.00 

28,689.53 

Rentals : 

From Property, Silver Avenue and Mission Street 660.00 

Interest 767.22 

Sale of Farm Products 23.55 



Total 332,326.19 



EXPENDITURES 

Howard Street Home Expenses: 

Groceries $ 909.65 

Meat, fish and poultry 1,424.21 

Flour and cereals 607.98 

Milk, butter and eggs 1,404.98 

Fruit and vegetables 428.14 

Clothing 139.17 

Medicine and medical attendance 906.34 

— 74 — 



Employees' salaries $ 4,493.30 

Regular nurses' salaries 868.00 

Special nurses' salaries 1,509.60 

Household supplies 300. 1 1 

Repairs 100.53 

Fuel 269.88 

Light 394.59 

Water 240.94 

General House Expense 657.90 

Laundry 422.47 

Bedding 51.78 

Linens 137.32 

Interments 200.30 



315,467.19 

Taxes 751.78 

Insurance 313.74 



Total cost of maintenance 316,532.71 

Silver Avenue Home Expense: 

Groceries $ 704.11 

Meat, fish and poultry 1,066.66 

Flour and cereals 294.55 

Milk, butter and eggs 848.84 

Fruit and vegetables 409.53 

Clothing 18.50 

Medicine and medical attendance 58.58 

Employees' salaries 7,218.05 

Household supplies 142.15 

Repairs 104.80 

Fuel 736.43 

Light 152.68 

Water 132.98 

General House Expense 253.68 

Laundry 524.47 

Poultry yard and garden 174.01 

Interments 164.50 



£13,004.52 

Improvements 296.61 

Insurance 331.18 

Taxes 658.35 



Total cost of maintenance 14,290.66 

Office Expenses 1,504.50 



Total 332,327.87 



Expenditures 332,327.87 

Income 332,326.19 

Less Endowment Fund 

Income Bequests. . . .$ 122.40 
Home Furnishings Do- 
nation 1,000.00 

1,122.40 

31,203.79 



Deficit $ 1,124.08 

— 75 — 



ASSETS 
Bonds: 

Par Value Book Value 

5,000 Market St. Railway 5% Bonds £5,000.00 

2,000 U. S. of A. 3rd Liberty Loan Bonds 1,911.96 

5,000 U. S. of A. 4th Liberty Loan Bonds 5,000.00 

1,000 U. S. of A. Victory Loan Bonds 1,000.00 

£12,911.96 

Savings Bank Deposits with Union Trust Company 5,658.84 

Cash: 

Union Trust Company — Commercial Acct 31,918.27 

Superintendent's office 375.00 

2,293.27 



Total £20,864.07 

New Home Furnishings Fund 3 1,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities Payable 1,306.92 

Capital Account 18,557.15 

Total 320,864.07 



FRIEDMAN TRUST FUND 
INCOME 

Interest: 

Savings Bank Deposits 3 394.06 

Commercial Bank Deposits 299.31 

Bank of California Stock Dividends 4,298.50 

Bonds and U. S. of A. Certificates 9,662.13 

314,654.00 

Rentals 2,668.00 

Profit on sale of securities 387.25 

Total 317,709.25 

EXPENDITURES 
Building Transactions: 

a/c Construction: 

Excavation and grading 3 2,632.00 

Plumbing 6,254.00 

Heating and ventilating 7,200.00 

Concrete work 60,000.00 

Electric wiring 7,800.00 

Steel 15,825.00 

Valves 70.85 

3 99,781.85 

Construction Expenses: 

Permits 3 266.00 

Architect's fees 2,315.25 

Insurance 882.60 

Superintendent of Construction 3,600.00 

7,063.85 

Total Building Expenditures 3106,845.70 

— 76 — 



Realty Expenditures: 

a/c purchase of realty adjacent to Sac. and Front Sts 3 169.34 

Trust Fund Expenses: 

Taxes 3947.72 

Insurance 79. 19 

Safe Deposit Box 15.00 

1,041.91 



Total 3108,056.95 

ASSETS 
Bonds : 

United States of America Liberty Loan Bonds and sundry 
railroad, water, electric companies and San Francisco 
County bonds of the par value of 3201,500.00, standing 
on the books at 3197,595.05 

Savings Bank Deposits: 

Union Trust Company 38,248.93 

Anglo-California Trust Company 1,900.77 

10,149.70 

Cash — Commercial Account 12,326.74 

Real Estate — Appraised valuation 93,651.46 

Building under construction 126,360.70 

Total 3440,083.65 

LIABILITIES 

Trust Fund— January 1, 1921 3424,001.07 

Income for 1921 17,709.25 

3441,710.32 

Less — Trust Fund expenses 31,041.91 

Written off Real Estate 584.76 

1,626.67 



3440,083.65 



Respectfully submitted, 
Audited and Approved MEYER H. LEVY, 

GREENHOOD AND JANSEN Secretary. 

Certified Public Accountants 



77 — 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



Incorporated January 4, 1902 



Location— 1057 STEINER STREET 
Dormitory Annex: Summer Cottage: 



1400-2 Golden Gate Avenue 



Larkspur, Marin County, Calif. 



COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION FOR 1922-1923 



OFFICERS 



President 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD 



Corresponding Secretary 

MRS. MORGAN A. GUNST 



First Vice-President 

MRS. C. R. WALTER 



Recording Secretary 

MRS. ANNA LEVI 



Second Vice-President 

MRS. M. ESBERG 



Treasurer 

MRS. ALBERT HABER 



Third Vice-President 

MRS. M. C. SLOSS 







DIRECTORS 




Mrs. 


I. S. ACKERMAN 




Mrs. 


J. B. Levison 


Mrs. 


A. Adler 




Mrs. 


J. W. LlLIENTHAL 


Mrs. 


A. L. Brown 




Mrs. 


P. N. LlLIENTHAL 


Mrs. 


Herbert E. Clayburgh 


Mrs. 


Henry S. Manheim 


Mrs. 


J. R. Davidson 




Mrs. 


Martin A. Meyer 


Mrs. 


Ludwig Frank 




Mrs. 


Howard Salz 


Mrs. 


Joseph Ehrman 




Mrs. 


Charles Schlessinger 


Mrs. 


J. J. Gottlob 




Mrs. 


Joseph Sloss 


Mrs. 


E. S. Heller 




Mrs. 


Sigmund Stern 


Mrs. 


Felix Kahn 




Mrs. 


I. N. Walter 


Mrs. 


S. S. Kahn 




Mrs. 


Irwin Wiel 


Mrs. 


M. S. Koshland 










ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


P. N. 


. LlLIENTHAL 




Rabbi Martin A. Meyer 


Henry S. Manheim 




Max L. Rosenberg 


Gerstle Mack 




Charles Wollenberg 



Miss Ethel R. Feineman Resident Head Worker 

Miss Ida J. Wolfe Assistant Resident Worker 



— 78 — 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1922 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD, Chairman 
Mrs. M. Esberg Mrs. Joseph Sloss 

Mrs. Ludwig Frank Mrs. C. R. Walter 

Mrs. J. B. Levison Mrs. I. N. Walter 

Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

HOUSE COMMITTEE 

MRS. J. B. LEVISON, Chairman 
Mrs. P. N. Lilienthal Mrs. Howard Salz 

Mrs. Clarence R. Walter 

EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

MRS. JOSEPH SLOSS, Chairman 
Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh Mrs. A. Haber 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman Miss Alma Levison 

HEALTH COMMITTEE 

MRS. LUDWIG FRANK, Chairman 

Mrs. A. Adler Mrs. M. S. Koshland 

Mrs. I. S. Ackerman Mrs. Anna Levi 

Mrs. R. Bine Miss Helen Son 

Mrs. A. L. Brown Mrs. R. Stein 

Mrs. Leo J. Clayburgh Mrs. Max Wolf 
Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst 

EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE 

MRS. HERBERT E. CLAYBURGH, Chairman 
Mrs. J. R. Davidson Mrs. Felix Kahn 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

LARKSPUR COMMITTEE 

MRS. M. C. SLOSS, Chairman 
Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. J. B. Levison Mrs. Clarence R. Walter 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

MRS. I. N. WALTER, Chairman 
Mrs. Lionel Alanson Mrs. S. S. Kahn 

Mrs. J. J. Gottlob Miss V. Lilienthal 

Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst Mrs. Henry S. Manheim 

Mrs. Louis Hertz Miss Blanche Son 

Mrs. David Hirschler Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. William Hyman 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

MRS. JOSEPH SLOSS, Chairman 
Mrs. A. Adler Mrs. C. R. Walter 

— 79 — 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

JOSEPH SLOSS, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 

David R. Eisenbach Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. C. R. Walter 

Mrs. M. S. Koshland 

FURNISHINGS COMMITTEE 

MRS. M. S. KOSHLAND, Chairman 
Miss Anne Bremer Mrs. P. N. Lilienthal 

Gustav Lachman Mrs. I. N. Walter 

GIFT COMMITTEE 

MRS. I. N. WALTER, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

AUXILIARIES TO COMMITTEES 
MOTHERS' CLUB 

MRS. J. R. DAVIDSON, Chairman 
Mrs. I. S. Ackerman Miss Millie Oppenheimer 

Mrs. M. Esberg Mrs. Charles Schlessinger 

Mrs. T. Gosliner 

HOME-MAKING COMMITTEE 

MRS. HOWARD SALZ, Chairman Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

ALUMNAE COMMITTEE 

MRS. ANNA LEVI, Chairman 
Mrs. Harry Hart Miss Helen Son 

Mrs. Henry S. Manheim Mrs. R. Stein 

Mrs. Howard Salz 



— 80 — 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 

With the opening of the year 1921, the Board of Directors 
of the Emanu-El Sisterhood, faced a huge task, namely the 
collecting of funds for a site and the erection of a building suit- 
able to house the ever increasing needs of this Society. 

In February, the drive for funds began. Every member of 
the Board of Directors worked tirelessly to reach the mark that 
had been set as our goal. In this we were most ably assisted 
by Messrs. Henry Manheim, Albert Bender, Herbert Clay- 
burgh, Charles Schlessinger, Alex Goldstein, Clarence Walter, 
J. B. Levison, Leo Clayburgh, Joseph Ehrman Jr., David 
Eisenbach, Morgan Gunst and Alfred Esberg. These gentle- 
men gave most unselfishly of their time, their energy, their 
encouragement in aiding us to make a smashing drive at a 
time when the period of financial depression had already set in. 
To these gentlemen may the sincere gratitude of the Board of 
Directors be here extended. 

In April a secondary drive was started. Many friends of 
the Emanu-El Sisterhood had expressed a desire to assist the 
good work, but were not able to subscribe any large sums. At 
the suggestion of our Head-worker, Miss Ethel Feineman, a 
* 'Brick Campaign" was instituted. Any one, who wished to 
help, could pay for a brick for the new building, represented 
by cards of the denomination of $1.00 and $5.00. 

With numerous other duties resting upon her shoulders our 
Head-worker undertook the tremendous task of reaching the 
hundreds of friends who wished to help to make the new Sister- 
hood a factor in the Community. 

Ably aided by Miss Ida Wolfe, she called to her assistance 
Messrs. Moses Stern, Max Blackfield, I. Beck, M. Rapheld, 
Harry Hart, Mesdames J. Coleman, I. Terkeltaub, L. Jonas, 
the Misses Eva Pincus and M. Spiegelman, the members of the 
Council of Jewish Women and members of the various Ladies' 
Auxiliaries connected with the Hebrew congregations. 

The Board through its representative thanks most sincerely 
these true friends. 

Again after working many hours in the day and long into 
the night, the active campaign closed with a collection over 
$3,500. Can you realize what this means ? With the exception 
of about $300 collected at two benefits given by the Y. M. H. A. 
and Y. W. H. A. the bulk of this sum represents the $1.00 
pieces that were poured into the "Brick drawer" by our active 
collectors. 

With about $1 15,000 in view, we proceeded to hunt for a site. 
In this new task, Mr. Lionel Alanson, whom we wish to here 
officially thank, put his time and experience at our disposal. 

— 81 — 



After visiting many prospects he finally assisted us in acquiring 
the property at Laguna and Page streets — a lot admirably 
adapted to our needs, with frontages on three streets, giving us 
the opportunity of building in such a manner, that all the bed- 
rooms will have outside lighting and ventilation. 

But if an attempt were made to thank all those who during 
the past year have been of greatest help during a time full of 
needs, this report would be unending. 

With the purchase of the lot and the selection of the archi- 
tects, the drawings for the new building were made, submitted 
to various committees and experts for advice and finally 
accepted, embodying, as we hope, the many wants that we have 
felt so keenly in the very cramped and inadequate quarters 
that Sisterhood has been forced to occupy during the last five 
years. 

The wish expressed last year that the early part of 1922 
would find us in our new building has been impossible of 
fruition, the disturbed economic conditions aiding materially 
in this set-back, but now that matters are progressing much 
more satisfactorily, we siiicerely hope that in another year we 
may be able to report active work in our new home. 

As to the work of the Society itself, that phase will be 
exhaustively covered by our Head-worker, whose report will 
follow shortly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD, 
President. 



— 82 — 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



ANNUAL REPORT OF HEAD-WORKER 

Quoting an excerpt from President Gunst's 1921 Report, 
the following words in reference to the Society's scope might 
well be applied to Emanu-El Sisterhood in a resume of a year's 
work: " Really the most interesting thing about the work of 
the Society, unfortunately but little understood by the member- 
ship at large, is the ever increasing services sought after for 
reasons other than that of economic distress. ... It is the 
knowledge of this type of accomplishment that is the chief 
inspiration to those who are actively engaged in our work." 

It is this type of accomplishment, apart from, and we trust 
preventive of, economic distress which is Sisterhood's chief 
inspiration and orientation. We can give you few statistics 
and fewer specifically outstanding results. There are some who 
still do not understand the true value of Sisterhood's scope, 
of that of any other preventive rather than palliative institu- 
tion. But there are many among you who place human reflec- 
tions above cold statistics, and spiritual values above concrete 
attainments; who realize that the finest, noblest influences of 
your own home and family life cannot be reckoned in figures; 
and that in the intimate daily living together of the Sisterhood 
family we can only vaguely estimate the worth when we stop to 
consider that all the girls whom Sisterhood houses or reaches 
are far from or have never known home and mother. 

It is this hearth and home with all that they imply and 
instill, which are open at all times, but only a glimpse of which 
can be here presented. In last year's Report, data was given as 
to the number of our Resident Girls coming from local or other 
Orphanages, from nearby towns or eastern cities and from 
various foreign countries. These records remain about the 
same for 1921, save of course the lesser number of immigrant 
arrivals. Other informative matter was given as to rates 
charged, ages of admission, and eligibility of applicants. These 
also remain unchanged, and can readily be referred to. The 
actual register then for 1921 shows: 

RESIDENT FEATURES 

Number of girls registered January 1, 1921 31 

Number of girls registered December 31, 1921 34 

Number of girls on average daily register 33 

Total number of girls accommodated during 1921 71 

Total number of girls unable to be accommodated in 192 1 57 

These figures are significant only as they are interpreted 
and understood. When the general fact is stated that Sister- 
hood House can now accommodate only thirty-four girls on 
its crowded register but that we have actually housed seventy- 
one in 1921, we must also realize that in providing for sixty 

— 83 — 



girls in the New Building, we must consider a like additional 
proportion. Nearly every other resident club in the city will 
furnish far larger totals ; but there is no other which shows so 
little turnover. For Sisterhood accepts no transients, except 
in extreme emergency. With but two exceptions in the entire 
year, of girls mentally unfit, our girls leave Sisterhood for 
only three reasons: To rejoin their family, to leave for other 
cities or primarily to marry and make their own homes. You, 
who are business men, will agree that to have a small turnover 
in a year makes for loyalty and efficiency; whereas those of 
you are happy around your own hearth will be interested in 
the following statistics compiled because of repeated inquiries 
as to our Matrimonial Headquarters with your Resident Work- 
ers as conscious or unconscious "Schadchens." 

Owing to the absence of records prior to October 1915, we 
submit the following data as covering only six years including 
the time when there were but fifteen girls in residence and 
announce the rather startling fact that exactly fifty Sisterhood 
girls have been married in this period. Of this number twenty- 
nine were engaged or married while in residence of whom seven 
held their weddings at Sisterhood House. From this number we 
have twenty-one grandchildren, fifteen living in San Francisco 
and Oakland, whose mothers belong to our Alumnae and whose 
parents frequently make their pilgrimage on Friday night from 
as far as Oakland and Redwood City. Our sons-in-law have 
been able to provide well for their households and our girls 
are carrying into their new homes many of Sisterhood's 
ideals. These may or may not mean much to you — they mean 
everything to us who try to make Sisterhood not a boarding 
house or mere temporary abode, but an anchorage which our 
Girls know is not just a Home, but their home; where the 
Fireside, the Monday Night Room Parties, the Friday Night 
candles and the programs later; the Sunday hikes, the summer 
week-ends and vacations at our Little House in the Hills of 
Mt. Tamalpais; their own self-arranged parties, dances, and 
holiday affairs ; their pageants, given on the various Holy Days 
— all these tend to instill a wholesale sentiment and arouse a 
loyalty and love for the simple but strong foundations and 
fundamentals of normal group life. 

For over two and a half years, we have enjoyed and bene- 
fited by self-government. All disciplinary training is con- 
ducted through this channel. Habits of domestic and social 
usefulness and resourcefulness are thus formed, responsibility 
must precede and merit privileges; whereas the individual ere 
expressing herself fully must first learn to live co-operatively 
and to realize group needs and majority rulings. Thus are our 
girls, we believe, better equipped to enter their own homes later 
or to become factors in Community Life. 

With their Good Works Fund which requires a regular mem- 
bership of $3.00 a year from every resident, from which they 



vote their own charitable donations or pleasurable activities; 
with the adoption of a Jewish War Orphan, subscription to 
Jewish War Relief and to all other worthy campaigns, our girls 
soon feel themselves a vital part of American citizenry and 
realize their obligations to Jewish ideals and traditions. In 
the editing of their house paper called "The Sisterhood Spirit," 
they are learning the art of written expression as well as of 
prompt co-operation. Through their Dressmaking Class under 
the able guidance of Mesdames J. B. Levison, Anna Levi and 
Henry Hart; their Business and Better English Class, under 
Miss Alma Levison's delightful instruction; the monthly read- 
ing group under Miss Victoria Lilienthars charming leader- 
ship ; the Wednesday night bi-monthly swim with Miss Lilien- 
feld as capable instructor and the weekly Rhythmic Dancing 
Class with Mrs. Rush and Miss Dreifus as talented artistic 
Directors, different groups of girls are enabled to find courses 
of instruction to meet their individual desires or talents. All 
of our immigrant girls attend Night School regularly and several 
others are studying music. It was gratifying to have one of 
our girls obtain a Bryn Mawr Industrial Scholarship offered 
in the summer of 1921 and to be able to have her enjoy same 
through our Goldstein Scholarship Fund. 

The question of employment is still a serious one with us 
and the needs of vocational preparation and better preliminary 
training have become acute. The majority of our resident 
girls are under nineteen or recent arrivals in this country. 
Resultantly this means part time education and apprentice- 
ship in the first instance, and the placing of others in temporary 
employment at extremely low wage under conditions not 
always conducive to loyal American ideals. You who have 
never had to seek employment, who have never known inse- 
curity, cannot fathom the despair of job-hunting or of job- 
losing. To fit our girls into the World's Work, to create and 
foster within them the joy and pride of good Workmanship 
and to study industrial needs generally, will be one of our 
biggest undertakings in the year to come. 

Just a word about Health, ere leaving the resident features, 
of which active committee Mrs. Ludwig Frank is the inde- 
fatigable chairman. Dr. Penfield, our consulting physician, 
gives every girl a physical examination upon entrance to Sister- 
hood and does general follow-up work. All clinic treatment 
and hospital care are gratefully obtained at Mt. Zion where 
Miss Abraham, particularly, has been inestimably helpful. 
Our efforts and hopes for an Industrial Night Clinic have been 
rewarded insofar as preliminary plans are concerned, whereby 
an Adult Health Centre one evening a week will soon be 
opened at Mt. Zion through the particular efforts of Mr. 
Lipsitch. Our girls have kept uniformly well, with no serious 
illness in 1921 despite the influenza; whereas a Health Commit- 
tee in our Girls' House Council, Health talks and charts, 

— 85 — 



and Health Standards constitute as vital and jolly a part of 
their living together as is their food or fun. In short, we are 
every day normal, happy, healthful, hopeful business girls, 
joyous in our job, jolly in our home, with Tolstoy's, Cabot's 
and our own Dr. Adelaide Brown's four corner stones of 
success: "WORK, LOVE, PLAY AND WORSHIP," by which 
we try earnestly and reverently to live. 

EDUCATION 

In this our first year without our many clubs and classes 
which now meet at the Y. M. and Y. W. H. A., we have been 
able to concentrate upon the few which still gather here under 
Miss Wolfe's admirable and able supervision. Chief among 
these are the Opportunity Classes for Children in the neigh- 
boring schools whereby with a little individual instruction the 
children are enabled to keep up with their grades, eighty-six 
per cent having made their term's work. To all of our volun- 
teer assistants in this field and to Mrs. Joseph Sloss particu- 
larly, as worthy chairman, our appreciation is hereby expressed. 
In addition to actual instruction given, Miss Wolfe despite 
her engrossing and splendidly conducted household activities, 
keeps in close touch with the schools and homes of the sixty 
odd children in attendance, arranges hikes, holiday treats 
AND SEEING SAN FRANCISCO tours, and is herself 
conducting one of the Juvenile Camp Fire groups, with Mes- 
dames Ballasz and Spiegelman as faithful and enthusiastic 
helpers. The Misses Nickelsburg and Prager are still inspiringly 
leading the senior Camp Fire Girls at Sisterhood; and Mrs. 
R. Stein and Miss Amy Dinklespiel are the capable energetic 
guardians of the Intermediate Group. The girls from these 
three groups give regular little suppers of their own cooking, as 
well as exhibitions of other homecraft, and of charming little 
plays and skits. Their many entertainments and outdoor 
sports are arranged entirely through their own efforts and their 
funds raised go to their summer vacation. 

In a recent series of lectures inaugurated by and held at the 
Emanu-El Sisterhood, the "Normal Girl and Her Needs" con- 
stituted the theme for the fundamental approach to and the 
sympathetic understanding of the young business girl of today, 
including also the adolescent girl whom Camp Fire and kin- 
dred movements reach. The city-wide response was gratify- 
ing. Sisterhood believes in the Normal Girl and will make 
every effort to keep her so by helping to provide proper hous- 
ing, steady employment and wholesome recreation. The few 
girls whom Sisterhood actually houses are but an infinitesimal 
fraction of the many hundreds of girls coming to our building 
continually and forming our regular and very large "clientelle." 

— 86 — 



RECREATION 

If the definition of Recreation means "Refreshments after 
toil," then verily every evening at Sisterhood House is recrea- 
tion. Our open fireplace and our Player Piano are the two 
greatest reasons "Why Girls Stay Home." How many of your 
own daughters or sons were at home New Year's Eve with a 
good old-fashioned House Party under your own supervision? 
At Sisterhood all of our girls (save three who joined their 
families out of town) found their fun in their own big living 
rooms, where they invited their men friends, danced and 
played games until time for Midnight Supper and closed the 
doors only in the wee sma' hours of the morning. This was 
the second annual New Year's Eve Party successfully arranged, 
with Miss Wolfe in charge. We do not merely advocate the 
love of and fun in one's home — we merrily practise it. Even 
a house wedding the following afternoon on New Year's Day 
did not daunt us, and all of our girls served as bridesmaids. 

Our Friday Nights are no innovation. The weekly program 
of alternate concerts, lectures and entertainments (ushered in 
by Friday Kiddush at table) are too well known and enjoyed 
even for comfort. When it is realized that we have never 
sent announcements or invitations of any kind for our Friday 
Nights nor spent one dollar for programs, printing or even 
music for these weekly entertainments, and that we have no 
stage or accessories, the fact that we have from 175 to 200 
people here every Friday or actually over 10,000 people here 
on Friday nights alone in 1921, you will agree that we need 
more commodious surroundings. 

Space and time permit only of allusion to our Tree Top Gift 
House in Larkspur where our girls enjoy their vacations, 
week-ends and rest; of our countless theatre and concert 
treats, given by our generous members of the Board and other 
friends, particularly our devoted beloved friends Mr. and Mrs. 
Gottlob and Mr. and Mrs. Manheim; and of our truly beautiful 
Succoth Pageant and Chanukah Tableaus arranged by Mrs. 
Agnes Rush and Miss Dorothy Dreifus, with our ever enthusi- 
astic Mrs. I. N. Walter and her assistants on the Recreation 
Committee in charge. Our Seder and Purim celebrations are 
also annual events, with our esteemed Dr. Meyer having 
conducted our Seder last year. 

Are any of these worth while — or worthy your support 
and interest ? You yourselves answered this question magnifi- 
cently a year ago when you proved your interest and support 
in furthering our campaign for a new and larger Sisterhood 
House and enabled our tireless campaign workers to return 
with victorious results. Our worthy President has told you of 
its success — and of the equally gratifying "Brick Campaign" 
subsequently conducted when our neighbors and Friday 
Nighters, even our Kiddies, became share-holders and vied 

— 87 — 



with one another in their hard-earned and self-sacrificing con- 
tributions. To know that they who use and love Sisterhood 
most, came forth so spontaneously in Personal Service as well 
as in over $3,500 in money, testifies to Sisterhood's place in 
the hearts and homes of the San Francisco Community. 

These are but the social and human by-products. Our 
actual construction will begin soon. But our new building will 
be a reproach if it be out of harmony with our ideals and 
your forward looking purposes. We are far from satisfied 
with our undertakings; our aspirations must become actualities. 
We are not just a place for working girls as some believe. 
Sisterhood has won its place as a Social Laboratory for Jewish 
Girls' Work in San Francisco, with particular emphasis upon 
housing. It will soon be ready to open its portals wide. Its 
program must be flexible, its vision clear. "Let not the foot- 
hills in the foreground obscure the steeper ranges beyond." 

To all of you who have so courageously and encouragingly 
removed mountains of difficulty; to the Directorate, Building 
and Advisory Boards particularly, and to our co-workers 
specifically, do we express appreciation, lifting up our eyes 
unto the hills and saying gratefully, reverently: "Establish 
Thou oh Lord, the work of our hands; yea the work of our 
hands, establish Thou it." 

Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL R. FEINEMAN, 
Resident Head- Worker. 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

Schedule A: 

GENERAL FUND 

INCOME 

Dormitory $ 8,446.45 

Donations 95.50 

Interest 180.25 

Rents 365.06 

Advances and Loans 268.98 

Sundries 371.18 

Larkspur Dormitory 309.59 

Federation 9,000.00 

Mothers' Club 92.95 

Total 319,129.96 



EXPENDITURES 

Sisterhood House Expenses 311,064.40 

Educational Expense 2,010.26 

Store Room 1,285.79 

Advances and Loans 236.40 

Rents 2,429.50 

Mothers' Club 159.93 

Insurance 51.18 

Sundries 136.12 

Larkspur Dormitory 1,444.68 

Larkspur Insurance 82.63 

Larkspur Taxes 52.25 

Sisterhood Taxes 587.82 



Total 319,540.96 

Expenditures 319,540.96 

Income 19,129.96 

Deficit 3 411.00 

Capital Account— January 1, 1922 34,592.95 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

Schedule B: 

ENDOWMENT FUND 
Income: 

Bequest of Sarah Sloss 3500.00 

Interest 40.20 



Total 3540.20 

— 89 — 



Disbursements: 

Transferred to Building Fund 312,000.00 

Transferred to General Fund 40.00 

312,040.00 

Capital— January 1, 1922 32,510.95 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Income — Interest 391.52 

Expenditures 94.80 

Capital— January 1, 1922 32,277.86 

FANNIE GOLDSTEIN MEMORIAL FUND 

Income — Interest 3202.00 

Expenditures 202.00 

Capital— January 1, 1922 35,000.00 

LARKSPUR FUND 

Income — Interest 3183.64 

Donation— Mrs. Julien Hart 100.00 

Total 3283.64 

Capital— January 1, 1922 34,754.79 

RECREATION FUND 
Income: 

Donations — Anonymous 3 20.00 

A. S. Rosenbaum & Co 11.53 

Board of Directors 230.00 

Total 3261.53 

Disbursements 3289.30 

Capital— January 1, 1922 3377.09 

BUILDING FUND 

Income: 

Donations from Drive 321,540.92 

Interest on Bonds and Savings Bank Deposits 1,897.63 

Collections a/c Pledges 50,853.85 

Collections a/c Interest 703.25 

Total 374,995.65 

Expenditures : 

Surveying 3 30.00 

Realty 12,603.82 

Total 312,633.82 

— 90 — 



ASSETS 
Cash: 

Anglo-California Trust Company $2, 147.60 

Union Trust Company 1,953.28 

$ 4,100.88 

United States of America Certificates 82,000.00 

Bonds 5,225.00 



Total Cash Assets $ 91,325.88 

Uncollected Pledges 42,938.15 



Total 3134,264.03 



DONATIONS 

Mrs. Leo J. Clayburgh, for repairs $136.00 

W. H. Thayer, for repairs 50.00 

David R. Eisenbach, for repairs 25.00 

Mrs. Henrietta Wiel, holiday treat 25.00 

Mrs. C. R. Walter, in memory of Mrs. Julien Hart 50.00 

Mrs. G. Brenner and Miss Newman Piano 

Mrs. Sigmund Stern Bronze Plaque 

Albert M. Bender Paintings and Pictures 

Dr. Amelia Gates Infirmary Table and Equipment 

The Misses Son Lamplighter for Sabbath Candles 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gottlob Dinner Gong 

Miss Blanche Bates Oriental Vase 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh Log Basket 

Needlework Guild Household Linen 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Bremer, commemorating seventieth birthday 

of Mrs. Amelia Bremer Oil Painting 

Mrs. J. Meyerfeld Rosh Hashonah Treat 

Donations for Succoth from Mesdames Joseph Sloss, S. Sussman, 

M. C. Sloss, E. S. Heller, C. R. Walter, Sigmund Stern, Charles 

Schlessinger and Mr. Charles W. Haas. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Manheim 

Season Tickets for San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. R. Samson and Mrs. A. Aronstein 

Season Tickets for Pacific Musical Society 

Mrs. J. B. Levison and Mrs. Herbert E. Clayburgh 

Season Tickets for Players' Club 

MEMORIAL DONATIONS 

Mrs. Louis Hertz and Mrs. Benjamin Granas, in memory of Mrs. Noah 

Bender. 
Mrs. J. J. Gottlob and Mrs. J. R. Dannenbaum, in memory of Abraham 

Haas. 
Mrs. J. J. Gottlob, Mrs. M. C. Sloss and Mrs. Leon Guggenhime, in 

memory of Samuel Dannenbaum. 



— 91 — 



SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD BUILDING 

FUND 



Abbey. Mrs. Edward S $ 100.00 

Abrahams, Mrs. Max 20.00 

Abrahamson, Mrs. Hugo 200.00 

Ackerman. Mrs. Charles L 200.00 

Ackerman, Isidor H 50.00 

Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Isidor S. 200.00 

Altman, John C 20.00 

A friend of Mr. Bender and Mr. 

Manheim 1,000.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo. ... 100.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 50.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Walter.. . 150.00 

Aronson, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham. 200.00 

Baldwin Jewelry Co 20.00 

Bamberger, Mrs. and Leontine 

Kuh 12.00 

Baruch, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick. 100.00 

Bauer, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel. ... 100.00 

Baum, Benjamin J 50.00 

Baum, Mrs. Clara 100.00 

Beck, J 25.00 

Bernheim, Albert 25.00 

Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan 

L., in memory of sister, Flora 

Bernstein 500.00 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Newton. 250.00 

Bissinger, Samuel 1,000.00 

Bloch, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 250.00 

Bloom, Henry 10.00 

Bloom, Jonas 1,000.00 

Blumlein, Jacob 200.00 

Brandenstein, Alfred J 50.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. H. U. 100.00 

Breyer, Sam T 50.00 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham. . 100.00 
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 

Lincoln 500.00 

Brown, Isidor 1 50.00 

Brown, Louis C 50.00 

Brown, Morris 100.00 

Brownstein, Miss Frances C 50.00 

Brownstein, Julius 100.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold I. . . 100.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Mayer 1 300.00 

Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert 

E 400.00 

Clayburgh, Mrs. Katy 200.00 

Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. . 300.00 

Clayburgh, Mrs. Simon 100.00 

Coblentz, Jules 50.00 

Cole, J.J 25.00 

Crocker, J 10.00 

Davis, Schonwasser Co 50.00 

Dernham, Miss Elsie 50.00 

Dernham, Mrs. Henry 250.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Emil 100.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

M 200.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

L.. 500.00 

Dreyfus, Emil B. and Walter 20.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. 500.00 
Ehrman Bros. (Alfred and Alexis 

L.) 200.00 

Ehrman, B. Charles 50.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph. . . 1,000.00 

Ehrman, Joseph, Jr 50.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M. 1,500.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sol W.. . 300.00 

Eisenbach Company 200.00 

Eisenberg, I. N., in memory of 

Ida Eisenberg 100.00 

The Elkus Co 100.00 

Elkus, Mr. and Mrs. Charles de 

Young 50.00 

Ensler, S 5.00 

Epstein, Arthur 50.00 

Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred I.. . 500.00 

Esberg, Mrs. Matilda 1,200.00 



Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H., 
in memory of Mrs. Yetta 

Hirschfeld $ 500.00 

Ettlinger, Isaac L 50.00 

Falk, Cam S 50.00 

Falkenstein, Monroe H 200.00 

Fleischer, Benedict 50.00 

Fleishhacker, Mrs. Delia 500.00 

Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert 1,500.00 

Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Mor- 
timer 5,000.00 

Fleishman, Mrs. S. G 100.00 

Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 100.00 

Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig. . . . 25.00 

Frank, Morris E 100.00 

Frankel, Herman 25.00 

Friedlander, Louis 100.00 

Friedman, A., Harry, I., and M. . 200.00 

Fries, Frank H 50.00 

Fries, Mr. and Mrs. William 500.00 

Gall, Mrs. Rebecca F 25.00 

Ganz, Mrs. Flora M 100.00 

Gerson, Samuel 50.00 

Gerstle, Mrs. Hannah 1,500.00 

Gerstle, Mr. and Mrs. Mark L. . . 100.00 

Gerstle, Mr. and Mrs. William L. 100.00 

Getz, Louis 50.00 

Golden, Isidore M 50.00 

Goldstein, Alexander 500.00 

Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford 

L 500.00 

Gottlob, J. J., in memory of 

brother, Joseph Gottlob 250.00 

Gottlob, Mrs. J. J 500.00 

Green, Harry 40.00 

Greene, Mrs. Louis C 100.00 

Greene, Mr. and Mrs. William. . . 100.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 200.00 

Greenebaum, Mrs. Emil 200.00 

Greenebaum, Leon 20.00 

Greenberg, Mrs. Joseph 25.00 

Greenhood, Mr. and Mrs. Carl... 10.00 

Greenewald, M. M 10.00 

Guggenhime, Mrs. David J 250.00 

Guggenhime, Mrs. Leon 1,000.00 

Gump, Mr. and Mrs. A. L 300.00 

Gump, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S.. . . 25.00 

Gump, William E 12.50 

Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. M. A 1,000.00 

Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan A.. 500.00 

Haas, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham. . . 1,000.00 

Haas, Charles W 300.00 

Haas, Louis S 100.00 

Haas, Mr. and Mrs. Walter A.. . . 300.00 
Haas, Mrs. William, in memory of 
mother, Mrs. Rosalie Greene- 
baum 1,000.00 

Haber, Mrs. Albert 200.00 

Haber, Mrs. J. C 100.00 

Hamburger, Mrs. H 50.00 

Hanak, Mr. and Mrs. 1 25.00 

Harris, Joseph 20.00 

Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Julien 300.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Jacob, bequest per 

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Sloss 1,000.00 

Heilbronner, Mrs. Fannie G 50.00 

Helbing Hat Co 200.00 

Heller, Mrs. Belle 50.00 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel S. 5,000.00 

Heller, Leonard G 50.00 

Heller, Moses 500.00 

Heller, Samuel W 200.00 

Heller, Sigmund M 300.00 

Heller, Walter S 300.00 

Hellman, Mrs. I. W., Jr 1,500.00 

Henderson, Mrs. Esther G 250.00 

Hertz, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 30.00 

Hirsch Bros 20.00 

92 — 



Hirschfeld, Albert $ 25.00 

Honigbaum, Alfred 50.00 

Hyman, Mrs. Morris 100.00 

Hyman, Samuel Lightner 30.00 

Hyman, William L 50.00 

Jacob, Andrew A 100.00 

Jacob, Henry R 50.00 

Jacob, Nathan 250.00 

Jacobi, A. Leonard 50.00 

Jacobi, Mrs. Jacob J 100.00 

Jacobi, Samuel L 100.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Samuel Nicholas.. . . 20.00 

Jacobs, William F 25.00 

Jacobson, Mrs. H 5.00 

Jacobson, M 20.00 

Jacoby, Mr. and Mrs. Philip I... . 100.00 

Jastro, Henry A 500.00 

Jeddis, Mr. and Mrs. Alphonse. . . 100.00 

Jewish Times 20.00 

Joel, Arthur 20.00 

Joseph, B. M 10.00 

Joseph, Mrs. Sidney 20.00 

Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. Felix 200.0o 

Kahn, Mrs. Henrv 20.00 

Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. Ira 250.00 

Kalisky, Mrs. Bertha 5.00 

Katschinski, B 100.00 

Katten, Mr. and Mrs. Simon .... 100.00 

Kauffman, Sylvan S 150.00 

Kauffman, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene. 100.00 

Kauffman, Mrs. Leon 200.00 

Kaufmann, William 500.00 

Kissel, I. R 50.00 

Klein, Lazare 100.00 

Kohn, Mrs. George A 300.00 

Kohn, Mrs. Simon 50.00 

Koshland, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus, 
in memory of mother, Mrs. 

Rebecca Schweitzer 1,500.00 

Koshland, Mr. and Mrs. Max I. . 200.00 

Kutner, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 250.00 

Kutner, Mrs. Amelia 20.00 

Kutner, Louis 50.00 

Lansburgh, S. Laz 350.00 

Lengfeld, Mrs. A. L., in memory 

of mother, Mrs. I. Cahn 1.000.00 

Lees, Edward S 250.00 

Levi, Mrs. Anna 50.00 

Levi, Mr. and Mrs. Herman 500.00 

Levison, Mr. and Mrs. J. B 1.000.00 

Levison, L. 10.00 

Levy, Mrs. F. H 100.00 

Levy, Mrs. J. C 5.00 

Levy, Jules 200.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Leon G 50.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs . Marcus 5.00 

Levy, Meyer H 25.00 

Lewin, Leon 150.00 

Lichtenstein, Mrs. Benjamin H.. . 100.00 

Liebes, Mrs. Ben 25.00 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Bertha G 150.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. 1 00. 00 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Jesse W 1,000.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. J. W., Jr. 150.00 
In memory of mother, Mrs. P. N. 

Lilienthal 1,000.00 

From Joseph L. Lilienthal, 
Philip N. Lilienthal, Theodore 
W. Lilienthal, Mrs. Elsie L. 
Beer. 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel. 100.00 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Sophie 200.00 

Lippitt, Mrs. Sydney 10.00 

Lipsitch, Mrs. Gertrude 25.00 

Livingston, David 200.00 

Livingston, Edward 150.00 

Loeb, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S.. . . 200.00 

Loewenstein, Mrs. H 25.00 

Loverich, S 200.00 

Lowe, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard. . . . 500.00 

Lowe, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 150.00 

Lowe, William H 100.00 

Lowenberg, Albert J 50.00 



Lowengrund, Mr. and Mrs. Lee. . $ 50.00 

Mack, Gerstle 50.00 

Magnin, I., & Co 1,000.00 

Manheim, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. 250.00 

Marcuse, Julius 5.00 

Marshal, Mrs. Charles 100.00 

Marx, Julius 25.00 

Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. . . 100.00 

Meertief, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 300.00 

Meyer, Albert 1,000.00 

Meyer, Alfred Falck 125.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Celine 50.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Henry 500.00 

Meyer, Rev. and Mrs. Martin A. . 150.00 

Meyerstein, Mrs. Jane 1 100.00 

Mierson, Max 20.00 

Moss, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac 200.00 

Musin, Ephraim H 50.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. David 500.00 
Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. New- 
ton H 100.00 

Newman, Jacob 20.00 

New-man, Mr. and Mrs. Juda 1,000.00 

Newman, Louis J 100.00 

Newman, Mrs. Sigmund J 100.00 

Newman, Mr. and Mrs. Simon 

Walter 50.00 

Nickelsburg, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. 50.00 

Nickelsburg, Mrs. S 150.00 

Oppenheimer, George A 50.00 

Pincus, Ralph 200.00 

Pursch, Mrs. Ryta M., in mem- 
ory of Lillian Manasse 5.00 

Putzel, Mrs. Estelle 50.00 

Raas, Mrs. Ida 100.00 

Raiss, Albert 100.00 

Raiss, Mr. and Mrs. Carl 500.00 

Ransohoff's 150.00 

Reinheimer, Isidor 25.00 

Riverdale Creamery 25.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. Achille 300.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. George H... . 200.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. Robert A 50.00 

Rosenbaum, Milton A 50.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 

M 200.00 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Charles W 150.00 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Sigmund D. . . . 500.00 
Rosenberg, Abraham, Adolph and 

Max L 2,500.00 

Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 100.00 

Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs. Irving S. 50.00 

Rosenstock, Mrs. S. W 250.00 

Roth, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel, in 
memory of daughter, Mrs. 

Jeanne Abrams 500.00 

Roth, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 150.00 

Rothchild, Herbert L., in memory 
of mother, Mrs. Joseph Roth- 
child 1,000.00 

Sachs, Mrs. Marv 150.00 

Sahlein, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 200.00 

Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 100.00 

Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Howard 100.00 

Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. . . . 100.00 

Samter, L., & Sons 50.00 

Saroni. Mrs. Louis 200.00 

Scheeline, Mr. and Mrs. Simon C. 200.00 

Schlesinger, Benjamin F 200.00 

Schlesinger, Bert 100.00 

Schlesinger, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 50.00 
Schlessinger, Charles, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles 250.00 

Schlessinger, Ernest M 10.00 

Schnee, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave. . . 100.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. Jonas 50.00 

Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 

E 250.00 

Schwabacher, Albert, Jr., Ethel 

and Jane 75.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Bella 500.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Carrie 500.00 

Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 200.00 



— 93 — 



Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. James 

H $ 250.00 

Schwabacher, Tames, Jr 25.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Abraham .... 200.00 
Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. 

Louis A 500.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Sigmund.... 200.00 

Schwartz, Joseph (Pacific Bag Co.) 25.00 

Schwartz, Mrs. William 5.00 

Selig Bros 25.00 

Seller, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 100.00 

Shainwald, Richard S., in memory 

of brother, Charles L 250.00 

Silverberg, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. 300.00 

Simon, Mrs. Gustav 100.00 

Simon, Mrs. Hattie 1,000.00 

Simon, Mrs. Stella G 80.00 

Sinai, Miss Ida 2.50 

Sinsheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Ber- 
nard 50.00 

Sinsheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 500.00 

Sinton, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 200.00 

Sinton, Silas D 10.00 

Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 1,000.00 

Sloss, Louis 100.00 

Sloss, Hon. Max C 250.00 

Sloss, Mrs. Max C 750.00 

Sloss, Miss Margaret 50.00 

Solomon, Henry 1 100.00 

Solomons, Mrs. Helen 100.00 

Sommer & Kaufmann 150.00 

Sondheimer, Sol 25.00 

Spiegl, Mrs. L. M 25.00 

Stahl, Mr. and Mrs. Adolf o 1,000.00 

Stein, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph. ... 25.00 

Steinhart, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. 300.00 

Steinman, Mrs. Bernard U 100.00 

Stern, Mrs. Jacob 100.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund 1,000.00 

Stock, S. M 50.00 

Strassburger, Mrs. 1 500.00 

Strassburger, Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
rence 100.00 



Sussman, Mrs. Emilie $ 500.00 

Thieben, Joseph 10.00 

Toplitz, Melville S 50.00 

Triest, Frank 100.00 

Triest, Jesse E 500.00 

Triest, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 25.00 

Unna, Harry 50.00 

Van Vliet, Mrs. Louis 20.00 

Voorsanger, Leon M 50.00 

Waldeck, Mr. and Mrs. Herman. 250.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence R. 1,000.00 

Walter, Edgar 100.00 

Walter, Mrs. Hannah 1,000.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac N., in 
memory of mother, Mrs. Rosa- 
lie Greenebaum 1,000.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. John 1 200.00 

Walter, Mildred and Rosalie, in 
memory of grandmother, Mrs. 

J. H. Neustadter 250.00 

Wangenheim, Emil S., in memory 
of mother, Mrs. Fanny Wan- 
genheim 500.00 

Wangenheim, Mrs. Emil S 500.00 

Waterman, Jesse H 75.00 

Weil, Mrs. A. L 250.00 

Weil, B., & Sons 50.00 

Welk, Miss Pearl, in memory of 

Bertha Welk 5.00 

Weissbein, Jacob 100.00 

Wiel, EliH 250.00 

Wiel, Mrs. Henrietta 250.00 

Wiel, Irvin J 250.00 

Wiel, Samuel C 5.00 

Wildberg, Arthur 25.00 

Wildberg, Irving 1 25.00 

Wolbach, Karl 100.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Max 200.00 

Wolff, Mrs. Moise L 200.00 

Zacharonsky, Samuel 20.00 

Zelinsky, D., & Sons 100.00 

Zellerbach, Isidore 250.00 

Ziegler, Mrs. Samuel 200.00 



DONATIONS TO THE EMANU-BL SISTERHOOD BUILDING 

FUND 



Aaron, Leopold $ 10.00 

Aaron, Moses 10.00 

Aaron, Simon 10.00 

Abel, Miss Rachel 10.00 

Abraham Drug Co 5.00 

Abraham, Miss Josephine 5.00 

Abrahams, Mr. and Mrs. Louis. . 100.00 

Abrahams, Pearl 10.00 

Abrams, N 5.00 

Adelsdorfer, John C 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. A. A 100.00 

Adler, Mrs. Jacob Lewis .... 100.00 

Adler, Mrs. Jennie Solomon 25.00 

Alanson Bros 250.00 

Alexander, Leo E. and Michael S. 20.00 

Altschul, Richard 20.00 

Annixter Bro 20.00 

Anonymous 220.00 

Anonymous, through Mrs. Esberg 100.00 

Anspacher, Philip 100.00 

Arnhold, Mrs. Benjamin 25.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig. . 100.00 

Aronson, Mrs. Charles 5.00 

Asher, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 25.00 

Bachman, Mrs. Arthur 50.00 

Bachman, Mrs. Sarah 50.00 

Baer, Mrs. Adolph B 100.00 

Baer, Dr. and Mrs. Julius 10.00 

Baer, Lucien 10.00 

Baer, Max 10.00 

Baerwald, Ernst 25.00 



Baruch, Mrs. Herbert M., in mem- 
ory of grandmother, Mrs. J. H. 

Neustadter. $ 100.00 

Baum, Mrs. Benjamin J 25.00 

Bayer, Mrs. Gussie, in memory of 

sister, Mrs. Noah Bender 5.00 

Beerman, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph. . 5.00 

Beermann, D 6.00 

Bellchambers, Miss Anna M. . . . . 5.00 

Bender, Albert M 250.00 

Benioff, George H 100.00 

Bennett, Miss Marie 1.00 

Berger, J 50.00 

Bissinger, Mrs. Adolph McKinley 20.00 

Blackfield, Bernard 3.00 

Bloch, Mrs. Frances 20.00 

Block, Mrs. Olga 5.00 

Blum, M. T 10.00 

Blum, Mrs. Simon. . : 20.00 

Blum, Wolf 10.00 

Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Max 50.00 

Blum, Dr. Sanford 20.00 

Blumlein, Emil 25.00 

Boas, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 20.00 

Bower, Miss Celia 5.00 

Brandenstein, Mrs. Meyer 50.00 

Bremer, Mrs. Amelia Bremer, in 
memory of husband William H. 

Bremer 300.00 

Bremer, Miss Anne 50.00 

Bremer, Milton A 20.00 



94 — 



Brick Campaign $3,404.17 

Brock, Mrs. Helene 25.00 

Brunn, Dr. Harold 25.00 

Buyer, Mrs. Charles 10.00 

Cahen, David S 25.00 

Cahn, Mrs. Babette 10.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Julius 1 200.00 

Caro, Isaac W 5.00 

Castle, Albert E 50.00 

Castle, Arthur H 50.00 

Castle, Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. . 100.00 

Choynski, Mrs. Herbert 20.00 

Circle C Club of San Francisco, 

per Josua Eppinger, Jr 5.00 

Clayburgh, Doris and Philip 
Barth, in memory of aunt, Rita 

Newman Jacobs 100.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Robert 2.00 

Cohn, Miss Ella 5.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Harry 3.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Hattie 100.00 

Cohn, Max M 50.00 

Cooper, Mrs. Minnie S 10.00 

Cowen, Mrs. A 10.00 

Cutler, Mrs 5.00 

Dannenbaum, Mrs. Coma 10.00 

Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. Julius.. . 34.00 

Davidson, Mrs. J. R 25.00 

Davis, Mrs 5.00 

Davis, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Percy L. . . . 20.00 

Deutsch, Miss Eva 2.50 

De Wolfe, Chapman 25.00 

Diamond, Mrs 1.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 

S 25.00 

Druggists' Wholesale Supply Co.. 25.00 

Ducas, S 5.00 

Edlin, J 15.00 

Eisner, Mrs. M. and Mrs. Mezin. 10.00 

Eloesser, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur.. 25.00 

Elsbach, Edwin A 5.00 

Elsbach, Herman 10.00 

Elsbach, John Patek 5.00 

The Emporium 250.00 

Eastern Outfitting Co 50.00 

Epstein, Gustave 100.00 

Epstein, Mrs. Henry 10.00 

Esberg, Matilda, Grandchildren of 60.00 

Farquharson, Mrs. CD 25.00 

Feigenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Julius 100.00 

Fleischman, Mr. and Mrs. M. R.. 10.00 

Fleischner, Dr. E. C 10.00 

Fleishman, Mrs. Adolph 100.00 

Frankenau, Mrs. Max 50.00 

Freidenrich, David 20.00 

Frenkel, Mrs. c/o Mrs. Heaven- 
rich 1.00 

Friedlander, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 25.00 

Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Myer. . . 25.00 

Frowenfeld, Mrs. Edward 100.00 

Funkenstein, Sarah 10.00 

Furth, Mrs. Melville 25.00 

Galland, Mrs. Minna 250.00 

Gamburg, Irving 2.00 

Glaser, 1 5.00 

Golden Gate Lodge 10.00 

Goldman, Isaac 25.00 

Goldman, Mr. and Mrs. Louis J.. 25.00 

Goldsmith, Mrs. B. M 2.50 

Goodman, Mrs. Joseph H 100.00 

Goss, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 20.00 

Gottschalk, E 25.00 

Greenbaum, Miss Ida 5.00 

Greenhood, Miss Frances 5.00 

Greenhood, Mrs. L 5.00 

Grunauer, H 20.00 

Guggenhime, Berthold 250.00 

Gyle, A. B 10.00 

Hamburger, Daisy 5.00 

Hammerschlag, J. P. and J. E 25.00 

Harris, Larry 100.00 



Hart, Julien, in memory of wife, 

Helen Louise Hart $ 500.00 

Hartland, Mrs. William 5.00 

Heavenrich, Mrs 1.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Alice A 250.00 

Hecht, M is Edith 50.00 

Hecht, Eiias M 50.00 

Heineberg, Mrs. J. A 20.00 

Heinsheimer, A 300.00 

Heller, Sig. M 100.00 

Herzstein, Dr. M 100.00 

Heyneman, Mrs. Lionel 25.00 

Heyman, Alex 20.00 

Heyman, Alvin 50.00 

Heyman, Oscar 50.00 

Hill, Mrs 2.00 

Hilp, Emma G 5.00 

Hirsch & Kaye 25.00 

Hirschberg, Mrs. David S 25.00 

Hirschler, Mrs. David 5.00 

Hirschler, Mr. and Mrs. E 100.00 

Hirschf elder, Mrs. J. 50.00 

Holcenberg, Mrs 5.00 

Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph.. . . 250.00 

Hyman, Walter G 10.00 

Iberson, Robert 10.00 

Ickelheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 5.00 

Isaacs, Josh D 25.00 

Jacobs, Fred 6.80 

Jacobs, Henry A 15.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Hyman 5.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Hyme, in memory of 
mother, Mrs. Ernestine Schles- 

inger 50.00 

Jacobson, Mrs. Samuel 20.00 

Jewett, Miss Fidelia 10.00 

Jolly, Sewers, c/o Mrs. S. E. Sel- 
ling 10.00 

Joseph, Mrs. Esther 5.00 

Juda, Mrs. Leon 5.00 

Kahn, Emile E. t in memory of 

Emma M. Kahn 50.00 

Kahn, Mrs. S. S 25.00 

Kaye, Mrs. Lillie 25.00 

Katschinski, Al 50.00 

Kaufmann, Joel W 10.00 

Koblik, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 5.00 

Kohlberg, Mrs. Manfred S 100.00 

Kollmann, Miss Lena 5.00 

Laboree, Mrs 5.00 

Lachman, Mrs. A 10.00 

Lachman Bros 50.00 

Lasky, Mrs. S. W., in memory of 

father, Samuel Kragen 25.00 

Lavenson, Miss Sara 10.00 

Lederman, Dr. and Mrs. E. D., in 
memory of Lloyd Liebes Leder- 
man 100.00 

Lengfeld, Miss Bella 5.00 

Lengfeld, Dr. Felix 25.00 

Lengfeld, Joseph 5.00 

Lenz, Mrs. Samuel 10.00 

Levin, Julius 10.00 

Levin, Max 3.00 

Levine, Mrs. L 2.50 

Levison, Mr. and Mrs. J. B., com- 
memorating Silver Wedding 

(additional) 500.00 

Levy, Mrs. Elsie Cook 100.00 

Levy, Miss Juliette 5.00 

Levy, Lawrence L 5.00 

Levy, I. W 20.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Lewis, Mrs. Isabella 20.00 

Lichtenstein, Mrs. H 2.50 

Liebenthal, Mrs. Albert 20.00 

Liebes, Arnold L 500.00 

Liebes, Leon I. . . 500.00 

Liebmann, Maurice 100.00 

Lilienthal, A. G 25.00 

Lilienthal, B. P 25.00 

Lippitt, Philip 10.00 

Loeb, Mrs. A. N 2.50 



— 95 — 



Loeb, Mrs. Jeanette $ 5.00 

Loeffler, Mrs. Charles 5.00 

Loeser, Mrs. Robert M 30.00 

Lowenberg, Mrs. 1 100.00 

Mack, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 200.00 

Mack, Jules J 250.00 

Mack, Mrs. S. L 10.00 

Malsbary, Mrs. Emma R 200.00 

Mundel, Mrs. Emanuel 20.00 

Manhetm, George K 5.00 

Manheim, Henry, Jr 10.00 

Manhcim, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 10.00 

Marx, Daniel 25.00 

May, Angelo M 20.00 

Mayer, Morris 5.00 

Mendelson, Mrs. Julius 5.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Marcus C 10.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Sam 50.00 

Meyerfeld, Mrs. Jesse 5.00 

Meyerfeld, M 150.00 

Meyerfeld, Mrs. M 100.00 

Michels, Mrs. Leopold 1,000.00 

Miller, Joseph 2.00 

Mitau, Mrs. Morris. . 50.00 

Mitchell, Mrs. Jennie, in memory 

of sister, Mrs. Noah Bender.. 5.00 
Moise, Mr. and Mrs. Leon, in 
memory of sister, Mrs. Noah 

Bender 10.00 

Morgan, Rev 1.00 

Morris, Mrs. Leon E 10.00 

Moses, Sigmund H 15.00 

Myers, Henry, in memory of wife. 25.00 

Myers, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

Nathan, Mrs. Flora 5.00 

Newbauer Bros 50.00 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Julian H. 100.00 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs.Sanf ord R. 100. 00 

Newman, Miss Jeanette 3.00 

Newman, Mr. and Mrs. Juda, in 
memory of daughter, Rita New- 
man Jacobs 100.00 

Neustadter, Mrs. B 5.00 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. Babette 5.00 

Oppenheimer, Miss Emilie 25.00 

Oppenheimer, Leopold 10.00 

Pacific Orient Co 25.00 

Pander, Mrs. E. J 5.00 

Pauson, E. H 50.00 

Pauson, Jacob W 250.00 

Raas, Charles 10.00 

Radin, Mrs. H 5.00 

Redlick, Henry 50.00 

Reich, Mrs. A. L., in memory of 

Marie Weisskopf 5.00 

Reyman, Mrs. Julia 10.00 

Rich, Alfred J. 20.00 

Richmond District Club, per Mr. 

Henry Friedman 10.00 

Ritchie, Miss Jessie 1.00 

Rosenberg, Mrs 5.00 

Rosencrantz, Dr. Esther 5.00 

Rosener, Leland S 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. Irma B 10.00 

Rosenshine, Adolph 5.00 

Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac L. 25.00 

Rosenthal, Max 2.50 

Rosenthal, N 100.00 

Rossing, Mrs 2.50 

Sachs, Miss Hattie 50.00 



Sachs, Sanford $ 500.00 

Salz, Mrs. Ansley K 10.00 

Samson, Mrs. Rudolph, in memory 

of daughter Hilda 1,000.00 

Samson, Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. . . 100.00 

Scheeline, Harold 20.00 

Schlesinger, Mrs. Gerald, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. Noah Bender 10.00 

Schloss, Mrs. Florence F 100.00 

Schussler Bros 50.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Abraham, ad- 
ditional 100.00 

Schweitzer, Mrs. Jacob 20.00 

Schweitzer, Mrs. Maurice 50.00 

Segal, Mr 5.00 

Segel, Rabbi Alexander 2.50 

Selling, S. E 5.00 

Setzer, H 5.00 

Shaen, J ' 20.00 

Shepherd, J 5.00 

Shirek, Herbert M 20.00 

Shirek, Sidney 10.00 

Shugrue, Mrs. B. E 5.00 

Silverman, Moritz 50.00 

Simon, Mrs. J 2.00 

Simon, Mrs. Theresa 50.00 

Simons, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 10.00 

Sinsheimer, Mrs. S. C 10.00 

Sloss, Mrs. Leon 100.00 

Sloss, Mrs. Louis, Jr 100.00 

Son, Helen 10.00 

Spandau, Mrs. R. D 75.00 

Speyer, Louis 2.50 

Spiegelman, Morris 25.00 

Stern, Mrs 10.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 1,000.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 500.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Moses 50.00 

Stern, Philip 5.00 

Stoney, Mrs. Gaillard 20.00 

Straus, Miss Emma B 5.00 

Straus, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 100.00 

Sugarman, A . 10.00 

Sugarman, M 10.00 

Sultan, Mrs. Sara 5.00 

Sussman, L. 1 25.00 

Tamalpais Campfire Girls 10.00 

Wand, Joseph 10.00 

Weaver, Chester N., Co 80.00 

Wedekind, Mrs. B 1.00 

Weinroth, Mrs 5.00 

Weinshenk, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 10.00 

Weinshenk, Sydney 5.00 

Weinstock, Mr. and Mrs. Harris. 500.00 

Weissbein, Mrs. J 5.00 

Werner, H. J 10.00 

Wertheimer, Mrs. Sarah 10.00 

Wertheimer, Mrs. Jacob 4.00 

Whist Club, per Mrs. Lobree. . . . 29.90 

Wiel, Alfred L 25.00 

Wiener, Mrs 1.00 

Willig, Miss Emma 1.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Julius L 25.00 

Wolf, Jacob W 50.00 

Wolf, Oscar 2.50 

Wollenberg, CM 5.00 

Wormser, Mrs. Louise 100.00 

Wormser, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel I. 100.00 

Zadig, Herman 10.00 

Zeimer, Mrs. Hannah K 10.00 



96 — 



HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Organized June 17, 1897 
Incorporated December 17, 1897 

BUSINESS OFFICE— 745 LAGUNA STREET 



OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 1922 



OFFICERS 



President 

M. SPIEGELMAN 



Secretary 

D. LANDE 



Junior Past President 

M. BLACKFIELD 



Treasurer 

P. L. BALLEN 



First Vice-President 

WILLIAM G. WEISS 



Custodian of Valuables 

H. J. HEPPNER 



Second Vice-President 

A. SUGARMAN 



Honorary Secretary 

J. SCHLUSSEL 



TRUSTEES 



Louis Abrams 
S. Berman 
B. Diller 



L. Licht 



A. W. Jonas 
M. Kaplan 
A. M. Lesser 



— 97 — 



HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The most difficult year, the year that has, thus far, been the 
most strenuous one to tax the best judgment of our Loan Com- 
mittee to capacity, has been concluded with the passing of the 
eighth year of my presidency of our splendid institution. 

Unlike other periods, when "the rich become richer and 
the poor become poorer' ' even the more fortunate classes of 
the people of our Country had their serious problems to solve. 
The 1921 economic thunderbolt struck rich and poor alike, and 
the suffering that it has left in its wake, amid the ranks of the 
poor of our people in our midst should be ours to alleviate. 

Ours is the task of rehabilitating our people, both mentally 
and economically. Our enterprise will call for sacrifice both of 
time, sound judgment and of our money; I anticipate that you 
will unhesitatingly and generously place these constructive 
forces at our disposal. 

No Jew should be permitted to become a public charge, 
whether as a dependent upon an alms giving institution, or as 
the recipient of free medical, hospital or other human neces- 
sity. While poverty cannot be rooted out in its entirety, 
financial and moral assistance properly distributed, under the 
standards and principles forming the basis of our structural 
existence, cannot fail to gradually thin down the ranks of our 
charity dependents. 

Our relations with the Federation of Jewish Charities have 
in the past been friendly and mutually beneficial. Our work, 
and the results we have attained, has and have, on numerous 
occasions brought forth the highest commendation of the 
estimable gentlemen shouldering the burdens of the Federa- 
tion. An undercurrent, which has but recently been brought 
to my attention, seems to have taken form and which, if 
permitted to gain in momentum, will be productive of much 
harm, of dissension and discord in the ranks of our people, with 
the resulting suffering that will be entailed. Rumors have 
been permitted to be broadcasted by some very well-meaning 
gentlemen, both by members of our association, as well as by 
members and employees of the Federation, that the Federa- 
tion of Jewish Charities will cease distributing to us our pro 
rata share of the public funds collected by it, and that it will 
allot to us only such sums of money annually as may be suffi- 
cient to defray our administration expenses, and that in the 
future the Federation will but loan to our institution such 
sums of money, as in the judgment of the Executive Committee 
of the Federation will appear to them to be sufficient to carry 
on our work. I want to assure you gentlemen, that these 
rumors, these predictions, are absolutely unfounded. I can- 
not believe and you must not believe such a movement on the 

— 98 — 



part of the Federation to be possible. You can count on the 
men delegated by the constituent organizations, to constitute 
the Federation, to fully carry out to the letter the resolutions 
that were adopted with the formation of the Federation, as to 
the purpose of its existence and as to the scope of its activities. 
Were these accusations and insinuations true, I should share 
with you the alarm; it would result in the throttling of our 
independent development and instead of continuing as an 
independent agency for constructive human development, we 
would be reduced to the standard of a mere tool in the hands of 
the Federation, to be wielded or kept idle as the managing 
power of the Federation might dictate. 

Such a policy on the part of the Federation would be in 
direct violation of the terms under which the Federation was 
formed, and under which we, in common with other institu- 
tions, entered into the formation of the Federation of Jewish 
Charities. If, perchance there be any of you, still entertaining 
a doubt upon this subject, I want to direct your attention to 
the opening remarks of Mr. Henry Sinsheimer in presenting 
his annual 1920 report, as President of the Federation of Jewish 
Charities. These remarks both reveal the purpose of the 
Federation and the general attitude of the gentlemen charged 
with the promotion of its interests and purposes. He said, 
"The Federation was organized for the primary purposes of 
collecting and distributing money for charitable institutions." 
These misunderstandings, whether existing between institu- 
tions or prevalent among the members of any institution, 
cannot fail to be productive of much harm. I trust that 
you will all apply yourselves in such a manner as will enable 
the Federation to raise all the funds that the constituent 
members of the Federation may require for their respective 
purposes. 

I desire to call to your careful attention the condition of 
our finances. As the secretary's report, which will shortly be 
read to you, will disclose, there were 564 applications for loans 
presented to us for our consideration. Of this number 129 
had to be cancelled and 435 were granted, the granted loans 
aggregating $73,331.50. The question will occur to you, 
"how did they do it?" Our allotment from the Federation 
was the small sum of $5,500.00 and had the use of a $5,000.00 
fund that had been set aside by the Federation for farm loans. 
As the secretary's report will disclose, we borrowed from mem- 
bers of the Board, during the year $7,000.00; used our $1,- 
700.00 building fund and put to work $1,950.00 which had 
been deposited with us either for safekeeping or as endorsers' 
security on loans. In brief, we used $10,700.00 in addition to 
our normal receipts. We cannot hope to continually impose 
upon the goodness of our members of our board to finance the 
needs and requirements of our poor people and you must recog- 
nize the necessity for making provisions for increased revenues. 

— 99 — 



The ministerial work of our institution has in the past 
rested, virtually in its entirety, upon the shoulders of our good 
secretary, Mr. Lande. The duties devolving upon him have 
grown from year to year, and have now reached such pro- 
portions that to perform these duties properly it has become 
more than a one-man's task. Some conception of the burdens 
falling upon the shoulders of our secretary will be gained by 
you if you contemplate the fact that in excess of $140,000.00 
have been handled by him during the past year. 

In order to relieve this situation, I would recommend the 
appointment of a competent Comptroller, into whose charge 
shall be given the keeping of all loan accounts, and the collec- 
tion thereof. He shall likewise attend to the proper applica- 
tion by borrowers of the funds borrowed from us and to furnish 
and procure such advice for applicants seeking our assistance, 
as their particular case may require. Practical and timely 
advice to a person in distress is, quite often, as beneficial to 
him, if not more so, than mere financial help. I would also 
suggest the employment of a competent stenographer to aid 
the comptroller in his work. I estimate that the employment 
of the comptroller and a stenographer will add $300.00 to our 
monthly current expenses; yet while this may appear to some 
of you an extravagant expense, I feel confident that the in- 
creased benefits that time will demonstrate to accrue to our 
dependents and to ourselves, will more than justify the outlay. 

Our books disclose quite a number of delinquent borrowers, 
and this delinquency is more apparent, as a class in the case 
of loans sponsored and vouched for by the Eureka Benevolent 
Society. We have approximately $2,000.00 due us on loans of 
the latter class. Were these delinquencies confined to 1921 
maturities only, the disturbed economic conditions of the past 
year might, perhaps, be referred to as furnishing the cause 
therefor. Unfortunately, however, our records show these 
tardiness of payments to have existed for the past few years; 
and what is of great significance, I find that quite a number of 
borrowers are compelled to repeat their loans, almost immedi- 
ately after their preceding loan has been paid. It is my firm 
belief that with but very few exceptions, these delinquencies 
are not ascribable to any neglect on the part of the delinquent 
borrower, but rather to the inability to pay. Your requirement 
that loans be repaid in twenty-five weekly installments imposes 
too severe a burden on the borrower. The load cast upon your 
borrower should not be fixed by arbitrary rules, but must be, 
if good is to accomplished, adjusted as to be in keeping with 
the material and physical condition of the particular subject. 
To accomplish this re-adjustment, I agree, will require almost 
the doubling of our working capital, and the trebling of our 
income. 

I am satisfied that when our problems are brought to the 
attention of the Executive Committee of the Federation, they 

— 100 — 



can be counted on to provide for us the funds necessary for 
our requirements. 

I would be lacking in a sense of appreciation were I to close 
my remarks, without some reference to our Loan Committee. 
Our burdens were shouldered by them like true Jews; ever 
conscious of their duties toward their less fortunate co-religion- 
ists. They have always been on hand, giving both of their time 
and good counsel, generously and unhesitatingly. 

M. SPIEGELMAN, 

President. 



— 101 — 



HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

INCOME 

Loans repaid £70,529.30 

Donations 15.00 

Rents 52.50 

Federation of Jewish Charities: 

a/c allotment for 1921 £6,000.00 

a/c Farm Loan Grants 8,850.00 

14,850.00 

Sundries 35.00 

Total 385,481.80 

EXPENDITURES 

Loans (435) £73,331.50 

Loans— Special 290.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities: 

Repayments on Farm Loan Grants 8,938.70 

Eureka Benevolent Society: 

Repayments on loans 129.00 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries £1,506.00 

Sundries 1,039.26 

Printing and Stationery 55.85 

Insurance 14.92 

2,616.03 

Total £85,305.23 



Number 
1 


Denomination 
£ 2.50 


1.. 


3.00 


7 


5.00 


2 


10.00 


2 


15.00 


1 


20.00 


17.. 


25.00 


2 


30.00 


1 


35.00 


1 


45.00 


1 


48.00 


71 


50.00 


1 


60.00 


9 


75.00 



CLASSIFICATION OF LOANS 

Number Denomination 

1 £ 84.00 

1 90.00 

106 100.00 

1 '. ... 120.00 

2 125.00 

24 150.00 

1 170.00 

1 175.00 

1 184.00 

59 200.00 

69 250.00 

9 300.00 

2 400.00 

41 500.00 



Total Amount of Loans £73,331.50 



102 



BOARD OF JEWISH EDUCATION 

SUCCEEDING 

JEWISH EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY 



Organized August, 1897 



The Board of Jewish Education which is appointed by the Federation 
of Jewish Charities, includes representatives of every element in the 
community. 

OFFICERS FOR 1922 

Chairman Treasurer 

MISS ADA GOLDSMITH M. SPIEGELMAN 

Honorary Secretary 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH 

DIRECTORS 

Aaron Altmann J. H. Linsey 

Rabbi Wolf Gold Rabbi H. Lissauer 

H. J. Heppner Rabbi Martin A. Meyer 

M. Kaplan Rabbi Jacob Nieto 

Dr. Samuel Langer 

MOSHE MENUHIN, Superintendent 

Aims to furnish education in Jewish History, Bible, Literature and 
Religion, through systematic, modern instruction at the hands of pro- 
fessional, educated and conscientious pedagogues, to all children in the 
community who are not provided for by the Congregations, as well as to 
Jewish children in institutions for delinquents. 

The courses comprise eight years of instruction, with five hours per 
week, for forty-eight weeks in the year and include club, chorus and Bar 
Mitzwa work. 

The enrollment in the school is: 

Children 

Cential Hebrew School, 926 Grove St 142 

Mission Hebrew School, 19th and Valencia Sts 53 

San Bruno Hebrew School, 2574 San Bruno Ave 76 

San Bruno Bible School, 2574 San Bruno Ave 88 

Daly City Hebrew School, B'nai Israel Synagogue 21 

Daly City Bible School, B'nai Israel Synagogue 22 

Boys' Aid Society, 460 Baker St 3 

Total enrollment 405 

It cost 310,245.49 to maintain the schools in 1921. 

Of this amount, 3871.38 was received from the parents of the children. 



— 103 — 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 



JEWISH EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY 

January 1 to April 30, 1921 

INCOME 

Federation of Jewish Charities 23,500.00 

Sundries 35.00 

Total 23,535.00 

EXPENDITURES 

Educational Expense 23,450.00 

Administrative Expense 154.85 

Total 23,604.85 



BOARD OF JEWISH EDUCATION 

May 1 to December 31, 1921 

INCOME 

Federation of Jewish Charities: 

Allotment 25,250.00 

Advanced Expense 750.00 

Tuition Fees 836.38 

Total .26,836.38 

EXPENDITURES 

Salaries 25,890.00 

Printing and Stationery 273.60 

Equipment 120.00 

Rent 169.95 

Collector's Fees 116.30 

Sundries 70.79 

Total 26,640.64 



— 104 — 



JEWISH COMMITTEE FOR PERSONAL SER- 
VICE IN STATE INSTITUTIONS 



Organized March 7, 1921 



OFFICERS 1922 



President 

RABBI MARTIN A. MEYER 
San Francisco 

First Vice-President 

GEORGE MOSBACHER 
Los Angeles 

Second Vice-President 

RABBI S. HECHT 
Los Angeles 



Honorary Secretary 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH 
San Francisco 

Treasurer 

HYME JACOBS 
San Francisco 



WM. R. BLUMENTHAL, Executive Secretary 
436 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, California 



SUSTAINING AND CO-OPERATING COMMUNITIES 



Rabbi A. G. Lafee 



S. R. Goodman 



BAKERSFIELD 

Homer Katze 



M. M. LlCHTENSTEIN 



FRESNO 

David L. Newman Leo Rosenberg 
Rabbi Alexander Segel 



Dora Berres 

Mrs. May W. Goldman 



LOS ANGELES 

Milton M. Cohen 
Rabbi E. F. Magnin 



Rabbi S. Hecht 
George Mosbacher 



Joseph Levenson 
Samuel Ghinsberg 

Albert Elkus 
Mrs. L. A. Blochman 



NAPA 

Mrs. Samuel Shapiro William Schwarz 

OAKLAND 

Joseph Meltzer , Matt Wahrhaftig 

Rabbi Rudolph I. Coffee 



SACRAMENTO 

Rabbi Michel Fried 

SAN DIEGO 

E. H. Samisch 



Gus Marks 



Rabbi M. H. Dubin 



I. Irving Lipsitch 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman Hyme Jacobs 

Alfred F. Meyer Rabbi Martin A. Meyer 

Mrs. Richard Newman 



SAN JOSE 

Representatives to be appointed. 



M. Arndt 



S. COHN 



STOCKTON 

Emil Gumpert 

ukiah 

B. S. Hirsch 



Roscoe C. Zuckerman 



Louis Hofman 



— 105 



JEWISH COMMITTEE FOR PERSONAL SERVICE IN 
STATE INSTITUTIONS 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1921 

INCOME 

Sustai ni ng Contributions : 

San Francisco Federation 32,250.00 

Los Angeles Federation 1,125.00 

Oakland Federation 300.00 

Stockton community 150.00 

Sacramento community 87.50 

Bakersfield community 75.00 

San Diego community 102.50 

Fresno community 144.50 

Donations 95.00 

Total 34,329.50 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries 32,300.00 

Travel and Relief expenditures 704.85 

Stationery and Printing 398.78 

Total 33,403.63 



— 106 — 



JEWISH COMMITTEE FOR PERSONAL SERVICE IN 
STATE INSTITUTIONS 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

The Jewish Committee for Personal Service in State Insti- 
tutions is the first organization of its kind in the United States. 
It owes its inception to Rabbi Martin A. Meyer, of San Fran- 
cisco, who for many years was President of the California State 
Board of Charities and Corrections, and to I. Irving Lipsitch, 
Superintendent of Social Service of the Federation of Jewish 
Charities of San Francisco. It is the lineal descendant of Rabbi 
Meyer's services to the Jewish inmates at the State Prison at 
San Quentin, to whom he brought, during a number of years, 
spiritual and material help. This hand-to-hand grappling 
with the problem of the inmates in but one State institution 
showed the necessity of extending this service to all State 
institutions and of performing such service systematically and 
by organized State-wide effort. 

Proposals were first laid before a conference of rabbis and 
social workers during the Western Jewish Chautauqua held 
in San Francisco in August, 1920, who endorsed the plan and 
agreed to recommend it to their respective communities. After 
a deal of correspondence and efforts to overcome the inevitable 
inertia, financial support for the first year, totaling six thousand 
dollars, was received from the Federations of Jewish Charities 
of San Francisco, Los Angeles and Oakland, and from the 
Jewish communities of Stockton, Fresno, Sacramento, Bakers- 
field and San Diego. In addition to its appropriation, the 
San Francisco Federation placed at the disposal of the com- 
mittee office room, telephone service and other facilities. 
Each Federation and community appointed representatives 
to constitute a State Committee. Due to the great distances 
within the State making it impracticable to hold frequent 
meetings of the entire organization, it was agreed that the 
San Francisco and Oakland representatives act as the executive 
body and that the delegates from the other communities be 
invited to attend the meetings. 

The first meeting of the committee was held March 7, 1921, 
in San Francisco. Those present were: Representing San 
Francisco: Rabbi Martin A. Meyer, Mrs. Richard Newman, 
Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., Hyme Jacobs, Alfred Falk Meyer and 
I. Irving Lipsitch; representing Oakland: Matt Wahrhaftig, 
Samuel Ghinsberg and Joseph Meltzer. Rabbi Meyer stated 
that the purpose of the committee was to arrange for the visit- 
ing, care, and after-care of Jewish inmates of State institutions. 
Officers were elected as follows: Rabbi Martin A. Meyer, Chair- 
man; I. Irving Lipsitch, Honorary Secretary; and Alfred Falk 
Meyer, Treasurer. William R. Blumenthal of Denver, Colo- 
rado, was elected Visitor to the Institutions, which title was at 

— 107 — 



a subsequent meeting changed to that of Executive Secretary. 
After a preliminary survey of the work in social service in the 
institutions of several of the Eastern States, Mr. Blumenthal 
took the field in California on May 5, 1921. 

FIRST SURVEY 

In the first survey of the State institutions during May and 
June, 1921, your Secretary found 441 wards of our faith and 
race out of a total of over 17,000. They were distributed as fol- 
lows: 281 in the six hospitals for the mentally sick, 67 in the 
two homes for the feeble-minded, 31 in the three reform schools, 
and 62 in the two States prisons. With the exception of the 
prisons, there were no lists of Jewish inmates available, and it 
was necessary to dig the Jewish names out of the records, 
checking them up by meetings, examining and questioning 
the individuals. Often I found names very misleading; R. 
Meyer, for example, proved to be a Catholic whom the priest 
often visited, and J. Murphy proved to be originally one 
Murphcovich, a survivor of pogroms of Kishenev, Russia. 

With the exception of the San Quentin Prison, I found 
that there had been no organized effort to visit the Jewish 
inmates and to render them material or spiritual assistance. 
In one hospital where there were fifty-six Jewish inmates, no 
Jew in an official social capacity had visited the institution in 
sixteen years. In another, where there were seventy-five 
Jewish patients, no one representing any Jewish community 
had visited in five years. An annual visit paid by the unpaid 
representatives of the B'nai B'rith Grand Lodge to the Preston 
School of Industry, and occasional visits by Rabbi Michael 
Fried and Leo Garfinkle, of Sacramento, to the Folsom State 
Prison, was the extent of the interest taken in the institutions. 
Everyone's business was no one's. It was not the duty of the 
Jews of any one city, but of the Jews of the entire State. 

PLAN OF ACTIVITY 

Upon the basis of the facts revealed in the first survey the 
following program of action was formulated : 

1 . To visit regularly the Jewish wards of the State institu- 
tions. 

2. To render remedial and constructive personal service. 

3. To conduct religious services and provide educational 
and recreational opportunities. 

4. To co-operate with officials, relatives and friends in the 
transfer and parole of inmates. 

5. To assist in the rehabilitation of discharged patients. 

6. To study the causes of mental and moral deviation and 
suggest preventive measures. 

7. To educate the public as to the nature of mental dis- 
eases : That insanity is not a crime, and that the sufferers should 
receive the attention due the sick. 

— 108 — 



HOSPITALS 

There are six State hospitals for the mentally ill, where there 
are approximately 400 Jewish patients. 

It has already been stated that up to the time we undertook 
the work, no Jewish organization had interested itself in visiting 
the State hospitals. Services weekly or bi-weekly were held 
for many years in the hospitals by both Catholic and Protes- 
tant clergymen, but they had not as yet developed and put 
into action the thought of Service. This was left to our com- 
mittee, and our labors have found such ready response with the 
Director and the several Superintendents of State Institutions 
that they have given us official standing and are encouraging 
other groups to do similar work. 

A survey recently made shows an appalling increase in 
admission to State hospitals, the incidence of increase being 
500 per cent in forty years. However, the encouraging thing 
is that the State hospitals today are more hopeful than ever 
before. No longer are they merely custodial, but they are also 
in large measure curative. No longer are there keepers, but 
nurses; no longer insane, but sick people. Hydrotherapy, 
occupational therapy, and better medical care have ushered in a 
new era in the winning fight against mental disease. But 
what the hospitals lack is contact with the outside world, so 
that those who are ready to leave may find homes, placement, 
and the proper supervision and aftercare. And just at this 
point our committee has been able to function with the great- 
est success. 

Of all who enter the State hospitals, about 35 per cent 
leave as "temporarily or permanently' ' cured, after staying 
less than a year. Those remaining in the hospitals can be 
divided into three groups : the hopelessly demented, who con- 
stitute about 35 per cent of the patients; those who remain in 
the hospitals, but who are appreciative of what is done for 
them, constituting 50 per cent; and the remaining 15 per cent, 
who under proper supervision and after-care can be returned 
to the community, rehabilitated and converted from social 
liabilities to social assets. 

In addition to the patients returned to their people who did 
not need our help, our committee during less than one year has 
rehabilitated or materially assisted in the rehabilitation of 
twenty-two patients of the six State hospitals. They comprise 
twelve women and ten men and range in age and station from 
an overworked high school girl of sixteen to a former society 
woman of sixty-five. Nine other patients are in the "process" 
of reconstruction. 

Though constructive effort has been the goal, remedial 
work and looking after the comfort and the good cheer of the 
patients have not been neglected. It will be of interest to note 
that your Secretary has covered 15,000 miles in going to the 

— 109 — 



State institutions and has made 3,000 visits to patients in the 
hospitals. During this time our committee has distributed to 
all institutions the following articles, most of which went to 
patients in hospitals: 1,500 newspapers, 600 magazines, 225 
books (magazines and books supplied by the San Francisco 
Section of the Council of Jewish Women), 3,200 cigarettes, 
1,000 cigars, 450 pounds of candy, 200 pounds of matzos, and 
also cookies, fruit, rye bread, herring, toothbrushes, shaving 
outfits, sheet music, violin strings, phonograph and pianola 
records, and sundry other comforts. 

More than 2,000 letters and cards were written to or in 
behalf of the patients. Relatives and friends were found and 
re-interested in their kith and kin. Work looking toward 
prevention and guidance was done with the patients, their 
homes visited, and wherever necessary other social agencies 
interested. 

Moreover, the committee has been successful in making 
possible the re-examination and reclassification of the patients 
by medical staffs wherever it was deemed advisable. Experi- 
ence has proved that there must be continual outside-of-the- 
institution interest in the patient, otherwise the stress of work 
and the vastness of numbers in the institutions make the possi- 
bility of neglect imminent. The most signal single achieve- 
ment of the committee has been its efforts in interesting officials 
in an After-Care Home for women mental patients, to be 
established by the City and County of San Francisco and to 
be supported in part by the State Department of Institutions. 

I cannot say too much in appreciation of the hospital 
Superintendents and their staffs. They have shown your 
representative marked courtesy, and have gladly assisted in 
every possible way. They have given me not only access to 
their official records, but provided me with all other informa- 
tion I needed. I want you to know that these men and women 
are of the highest personal and professional calibre, and often 
sacrifice much for their work. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF AND THE 

BLIND 

The School for the Deaf and Blind Children at Berkeley, 
under the supervision of the State Board of Education, has 
just recently been reorganized into two separate schools, one 
for the blind and the other for the deaf. These are boarding 
schools for nine months of the year. During the summer the 
children return to their homes, if they have any. The unfortu- 
nate children often receive no care during the summer months. 
Upon returning home in their vacation time, three of the eleven 
Jewish children remain on the streets while their parents are 
out working. The schools have no social workers for after- 
care, and the Superintendent indicated that he has no oppor- 

— 110 — 



tunity for keeping in touch with the students after they leave 
the school. 

The proper authorities should be shown the necessity for a 
social worker in the school. 

STATISTICS 

Deaf 12 

Blind 1 

Total 13 

Boys 8 

Girls 5 

THE STATE SCHOOLS 

The Jewish students of the State schools are at once our 
greatest problem and our greatest opportunity. There we have 
a chance for intensive work, which will pay splendid social 
dividends. The boys and girls have responded capitally to our 
interest in their welfare, and their records in school are a fair 
index of their appreciations. We have had excellent co-opera- 
tion from all the Superintendents. Their sympathetic under- 
standing of the problems involved has been of inestimable 
help in our work. 

We keep in close contact with the boys and girls in the 
State schools, correspond with parents after each visit, and 
wherever possible call on the parents and make plans and 
preparations for the return of the children to their homes, 
where further education or employment will be awaiting them. 

STATISTICS OF JEWISH WARDS 

In State Schools April 1, 1922 

Preston 9 

Whittier 5 

Ventura 3 

Total 17 

Totals for Schools 

Number in May, 1921 17 

Number admitted during year 13 

Total 30 

Number paroled 8 

Number discharged 5 

Total 13 

Number remaining 17 



— Ill — 



HOMES FOR THE MENTALLY DEFICIENT 
Sonoma State Home and Pacific Colony 

There are seventy-six Jewish inmates in the homes for the 
mentally deficient, twenty-eight of whom are morons and 
eleven dull normals. A number can be returned to the com- 
munity to become assets instead of liabilities if the proper 
place can be found. There are boys and young men who 
would under proper supervision make excellent workers; 
girls and women who under proper placement and supervision 
can be returned to normal life as domestic or other help. 
Already a step in the right direction has been made in our 
interesting proper authorities in the projected San Francisco 
After-Care Home, where those who return from the Sonoma 
Home may find refuge preparatory to their being placed in the 
community. 

The Sonoma Home is now prepared with school facilities 
where those mentally handicapped may receive training that 
will fit them for the duties of normal life. We have been aiding 
the State Home in getting consents from parents for steriliza- 
tion and informing the public of its urgent necessity. 

Our work in the homes for mentally deficient thus far has 
been mainly in bringing comfort and cheer to the patients. 
With the After-Care Home a reality, we shall be able to 
* 'carry on" work in rehabilitation. 

STATE PRISONS 

In the prisons we have the opportunity of working with 
enlightened wardens of modern institutions. The work of 
Rabbi Meyer in San Quentin, covering so many years of ex- 
cellent service, has set a standard which your Secretary has 
endeavored to maintain. The efforts of the Sacramento visi- 
tors to Folsom have already been referred to in a previous 
paragraph. 

There is an increasing number of boys at San Quentin 
State Prison, most of them coming from broken homes. It is 
noteworthy that frequently boys are sent to San Quentin for 
having committed lesser crimes than those who are sent to the 
school at Preston. Many prisoners are drifters from other 
States. There is an ever-increasing number of drug addicts in 
the prisons. There is a very large percentage of boys who 
have stolen automobiles, and also of forgers. We find that the 
latter are among the most difficult to rehabilitate, and that but 
few make good. 

During the year we wrote 750 letters to or in behalf of the 
San Quentin inmates and 350 letters to and in behalf of those 
in Folsom. We furnished transportation to paroled or dis- 
charged prisoners for return to their homes in the East. Loans 
were made to the men to tide over their periods of rehabili- 
tation. Wearing apparel is often furnished, for most of the 

— 112 — 



men do not wish to wear the clothes provided them by the 
State. To those within the prison we furnished eyeglasses, 
dental work not supplied by the State, postage stamps, writing 
material, books, magazines, and various other necessities. 

The State of California allows only five dollars to each 
prisoner released. This is entirely inadequate, and we supple- 
ment this amount by loans to the men wherever necessary. 
Most of these loans have been paid back. We could perform 
an excellent service to the State by bringing before public 
officials the necessity of varying allowances given discharged 
men according to conditions and circumstances that at all 
events will make it possible for them to maintain themselves 
in decency until they receive their first wages. 

We are grateful to Wardens Johnston and Smith, Parole 
Officer Ed. D. Whyte and Chaplain-Director of Education 
Laizure for their capital co-operation in our work with the 
prisoners and with paroled men. 

STATISTICS 

San Quentin 

Number in May, 1921 38 

Number entered during year 20 

Total 58 

Number paroled 11 

Number discharged 3 14 

Number remaining April 1, 1922 44 

Folsom 

Number in May, 1921 24 

Number entered during year 8 

Total 32 

Number paroled 1 

Number discharged 4 5 

Number remaining April 1, 1922 27 

WORK DONE OUTSIDE OF STATE INSTITUTIONS 
Supervision and After-Care 

We can take greatest pride in our work of after-care for 
those discharged from the various State institutions. It has 
more than met our expectations, since nearly 90 per cent of 
those for whom we have assumed responsibility have been 
rehabilitated. We have cared for thirty-five former patients 
and inmates of our faith after their discharge, which include 
twenty-two from hospitals, five from schools and eight from 
prisons. 

Service to Non-Jews 

At the outset your Secretary advised the several Superin- 
tendents of our willingness to be of service to non-Jews who 

— 113 — 



are unaffiliated with other denominations. Accordingly, at 
the request of Superintendents, social agencies, friends and 
relatives, we rendered service of various kinds to sixty-two 
non-Jews in the State institutions, forty-two of whom were in 
the hospitals, eight in the prisons, and four in the schools. 

Contacts with Friends and Relatives 

During the year we either visited or had interviews or 
correspondence with 2,300 friends and relatives of patients 
and inmates. 

Publicity 

During the year, your Secretary spoke on our work in 
thirteen cities, addressing thirty-eight audiences, comprising a 
total of over 9,000 persons. 

Visits to County Institutions 

In the interest of comity, your representative made thirty- 
one visits to fourteen institutions in six counties. 

Statistics 

Hospitals and Homes 

Patients 

Found, May, 1921 345 

Discovered during year 66 

Entered during year 74 

Total 485 

Granted leave of absence 36 

Discharged as cured 23 

Died 22 

81 

Total in hospitals and homes, April 1, 1922 404 

These include: 

Ex-service men 23 

Other men 178 

Women 180 

Children 23 

Total 404 

Classification of Mental Diseases 

Praecox — Paranoid 41 

11 Hebephrenic 26 

11 Catatonic 11 

Simple 9 

Unspecified 99 

Total Praecox 186 

Manic Depressive Psychosis 40 

Paresis 12 

Epilepsy with Psychosis 10 

— 114 — 



Miscellaneous Psychosis 38 

Melancholia, Involutional 9 

Drug Addicts 2 

Neurasthenia 4 

Total Miscellaneous 115 

Undiagnosed or information lacking 24 

Total Hospitals 325 

Feeble-minded 79 

Total Hospitals and Homes 404 

Disposition 

Granted leave, for whom our committee assumed responsibility 22 

Patients re-examined at our request 49 

Removals to more hopeful departments 27 

Granted freedom of grounds 21 

Given more suitable occupations 18 

Friends and relatives who visited at our instigation 56 

Estimated number of parcels sent by friends and relatives to patients 
due to our representations 175 

NATIVITY OF JEWISH PATIENTS 

Hospitals 

Prisons Schools and Homes Total 

Born in California 11 17 84 112 

Born in other States 44 27 185 256 

Born abroad 16 5 135 156 

Total 71 49 404 524 

Committed from: 

San Francisco 20 18 197 235 

Los Angeles 36 24 146 206 

Rest of State 15 7 61 83 

Total 71 49 404 524 

Proportions: Per cent 

Inmates Jewish Jewish 

Hospitals 12,006 325 2.70 

Homes for Feeble- Minded 1,830 79 4.31 

State Schools 1,766 49 2.77 

Prisons 3,619 71 1.96 

19,221 524 2.72 

Note. — California's Jewish population is estimated'to be 3.5 per cent 
of the entire population. 



— 115 



CONCLUSION 

In all our work we have endeavored to treat the wards of 
the State not as a group, but as individuals; not as cases, but as 
human beings. We have aimed not so much at Services as at 
Service. We have not lectured, but have listened. The key 
that has unlocked the hearts of patients and inmates has been 
the age-old method of sympathetic understanding and patience. 
We find that it does not take elaborate programs or much 
money to bring light to those who dwell in darkness. A postal 
card with a few words of cheer is often carried for weeks in the 
bosom of a patient. A letter from your Secretary brings joy 
to a score of afflicted. By our work we are helping not only 
our own, but ultimately all the State wards and their depen- 
dents. 

We are now officially recognized by the State authorities 
as a co-operating agency. Our work has passed the experi- 
mental stage and is now being watched with keenest interest 
by other groups of religious and social forces. God help us 
bring more sunlight to those in need of it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. R. BLUMENTHAL, 

Executive Secretary. 



— 116 — 



Map of California 

showing locations of State Institutions 
visited and the Sustaining and Co- 
operating Communities of the Jewish 
Committee for Personal Service in 
State Institutions. 



REFER TO PRECEDING PAGE FOR STATE INSTITUTIONS 




SC signifies Sustaining Com- 
munity. 

CC signifies Co-operating Com- 
munity. 
All other cities shown are in 
process of organization. 



117 — 



Yk<u^ 



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